Banding / IDing your birds - its important

Discussion in 'Geese' started by CelticOaksFarm, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Banding/IDing is an important part of owning any poultry/fowl. They are used for a number of things from gender ID, to pen ID, to parentage to ownership. If the bird(s) happen to get loose and become lost an ID band with yout info on it can help those who find them return them.

    We use them for multiple things.
    • Left legs are banded (zip ties blue & pink) to visually ID gender quickly when large numbers are free ranging together. This make splitting back up into breeding sets much quicker.
    • Right legs and or wings are banded with numbered and embossed (farm name and phone #) for accurate record keeping.
    • Left legs are banded (zip ties, any color other than blue/pink) to ID birds for new owners. This way we can allow the birds to free range together prior to shipping, but easily pick out the birds who need to be boxed together for shipping. It also allows us to tell new owners that their birds have Numbers X,Y,Z and are wearing zip tie color ___.

    Zip ties are NEVER removed prior to shipping the birds so owners can visually ID the new birds upon arrival. The new owners can remove them if they want. Using a combination of ID measures ensures we can track and identify birds easily for both our own use and for new customers as well. When we post birds for sale, we like to post a picture of the bird showing the entire body and legs (with zip ties in place) and also list the number from their permanent band (leg or wing). That way when birds are selected the new owner knows right away how to ID the birds and is assured the bird they select is the bird they get.

    You may each of your birds very well and their personalities, but a new owner wont. So if you tell them the gander is wearing X color and likes this food/treat, or is afraid of ___ they will easily transition them to their new home.

    Using permanent bands helps keep very detailed breeding records for the future. This way you are able to read over your previous season notes, know how many of each gender was produced from each group. It helps when you retain birds for future breeding as well to ensure you are keeping lines separate and inbreeding to severely.

    There is no one perfect way to ID birds, but through the use of various systems available, or a combination of them you should be able to put in place an easy way to keep accurate records you can refer back to for years to come.


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    You can download the file by clicking below to save to your own computer
     
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  2. Going Bhonkers

    Going Bhonkers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm one of those owners that, like you mentioned can tell my geese apart. But I definitely think banding is a good idea in case they happen to escape from our fenced in property. Wing bands seem too intrusive to me, because doesnt it pierce their skin? And isnt it hidden by their feathers? I seem to lean towards leg bands (and especially like the ones that can have my ph # on them, didnt know they existed!), but I worry about dirt or foreign matter collecting between the band and the goose's leg. Is it possible for you to post a close up picture of goose wearing a band (preferably a metal one, if you use those)?
     
  3. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Florida - Space Coast
    GB I dont have our new butt end bands in yet, but do have the Atlas bands and we plan to band all the dewlaps tomorrow before they are let out of their stalls for the day. Will get pictures of putting them on and how they fit. I am guessing we will be swapping out the atlas bands with them at some point due to their growth yet to come.

    below is Lucy she has on a butt end leg band

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    Last edited: Nov 24, 2012
  4. Going Bhonkers

    Going Bhonkers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, they are a lot more snug than I thought. I know they're permanent, but is there a way to get them off in case you absolutely need to? (the butt end ones)
     
  5. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Florida - Space Coast
    it actually slides all the way up to her knee and back down, but yes they just pull open. the atlas bands are thin enough metal we can cut them off if needed with hubby's EMT scissors.
     
  6. Tivona

    Tivona Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Concerning the zip ties, it seems to me that the geese who love toys would pull on them and could make them tighter by accident. Have you ever had a problem with this or does cutting the tag end off super close prevent the geese from over tightening the zip ties?
     
  7. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Florida - Space Coast
    we use wire cutters to cut the ends off right next to the box on the zip ties, nothing to get ahold of then to pull on and make the tighter. If used on younger birds you will have to switch them out as they grow.
     
  8. launius

    launius Out Of The Brooder

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    I am planning to use a permant leg band and zip tie combo system to keep track of my ducks buy have a few questions...

    With the butt end bands (or any other permanent leg band), at what age do you band them?

    Also, have you found a size chart that is accurate?
     

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