Bantam roo accidentaly hit on neck/face, help!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cucharitavoce, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. cucharitavoce

    cucharitavoce Just Hatched

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    Nov 20, 2014
    Hawthorne, CA
    Good morning, I'm hoping someone can help me. I have a 7 month old bantam frizzle rooster, in the past few months he's become aggressive towards me when I am around and he's pecked me three times, so I am a little afraid of him now. Today before leaving work I let them out and opened a window that opens up outwards and stays up with a stick, he jumped up to the frame and I got scared and dropped the window, but I was not able to catch it and it hit his neck/face. I am not 100% percent sure, everything happened so fast and I freaked out to see him drop and make a horrible noise and it looked as though he was having a seizure or something like it. I picked him up and held him up, but his left eye was semi-shut and his beak was half open, I kept massaging his neck and let him down to see if he could get up, he did, but was walking rather slowly and seemed a little out of it. I had to leave because I was running late for work, but I am rather concerned, my boyfriend told me was still walking slow and making very little noise, I am not sure he's even crowing. I am afraid of getting home and him not being alive, I am traumatized and the only image I have is that of him dropping and going through something similar to a seizure. What can I do
     
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  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    From a practical viewpoint, he sounds like he has head/neck trauma, and there's not really anything you can do for it. He will either survive or he won't.

    In future though I wouldn't massage injured animals almost as a rule, just in case it does further damage; in this case it's not too likely it did, but some people have been too hands-on with things like broken spines, smashed legs, etc, so I figure I'd best give a warning just in case. Sometimes you can't tell what the damage is, so best not to fiddle with it.

    What you can do, is stop blaming yourself. It was an accident.

    If he were mine, he'd be missing his head, and that'd be no accident, and I also wouldn't be blaming myself. He's got a rotten attitude, and he's displaying it quite young, which is an extra warning sign, generally.

    Preserving birds like him to breeding age leads to many people being attacked and many flocks living under stress and abuse. He's not worth keeping alive, sorry. For every vicious rooster people take pity on and lavish time and love on, trying to change him which basically never works, decent roosters who'd never attack a human are dying for want of a good home. It's an ugly and back-to-front situation where the abusive animals, worth the least, get the most, and the best animals get nothing. Almost like being abusive means they need more love, lol. I guess it's just human nature, maybe... It's a tragedy.

    Best wishes, and [​IMG]
     
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  3. Book Em Danno25

    Book Em Danno25 Overrun With Chickens

    do you have any pics?
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I think perhaps my first post looks a bit harsh and could be taken wrong... I wasn't trying to blame you or have a go at you, at all; pretty much everyone's been in your situation with an aggressive rooster.

    It clearly wasn't your fault, and there's nothing you can do about blunt impact trauma like that, so just waiting and seeing how it turns out is all you can do, pretty much.

    Don't be harsh on yourself about it, either way.

    Best wishes.
     
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  5. cucharitavoce

    cucharitavoce Just Hatched

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    Nov 20, 2014
    Hawthorne, CA
    Thank you so much for your response, I went home for lunch to check on him, he was lying under a wisteria vine, he's still moving slowly, but he's eye looks rather swollen and his crest is very red (more than usual). I hope he gets well soon, I do appreciate your input on this situations. I will probably take photos of his eye tomorrow since it will be dark by the time I get home.

    Thank you.
     
  6. cucharitavoce

    cucharitavoce Just Hatched

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    Nov 20, 2014
    Hawthorne, CA
    I will take photos tomorrow morning.
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Glad you didn't take offense.

    It's normal for an injured animal to not eat for a day or two, if he does this, don't worry; it lets his body marshal all its energies towards healing rather than digesting. It ensures he can heal faster; they can't starve to death in one or two days like some other birds. Sometimes eating while injured can kill them just because it's a drain they can't afford to support at that moment. Not all animals are smart enough to do what is best for their bodies, instinct levels vary between individuals.

    You can offer him something like electrolytes in water, even honey will do for that, it won't tax his body like solid foods will. Depending on how cold it gets where you are, he may need heating at night, or he may be fine.

    As you know I'm all for not breeding such animals, but I do believe it's important to remain humane in our treatment of them, I've tended a few animals through injuries or illnesses despite knowing they were destined for the pot.

    Best wishes.
     
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  8. cucharitavoce

    cucharitavoce Just Hatched

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    Nov 20, 2014
    Hawthorne, CA
    I'm really thankful for all your advice, I will keep this things in mind when I get home to tend to him.I am in Los Angeles, CA and the lowest it will get here tonight will be low 55 degrees Fahrenheit is that too cold? Thanks for all your help.
     
  9. Book Em Danno25

    Book Em Danno25 Overrun With Chickens

    do you have the pics?
     
  10. DaveOmak

    DaveOmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    FWIW, farmers have had problems with aggressive animals for years.... They cull them... Continuing aggressive genetics is not a good plan...

    There is no reason to keep aggressive animals, especially, when you are afraid of them....

    Your flock is supposed to provide enjoyment and relaxation for you.... Donate him to someone's stew pot....
     

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