Bantam rooster in love with handicap larger rooster..

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by xyuingnutfarms, Jul 15, 2016.

  1. xyuingnutfarms

    xyuingnutfarms Out Of The Brooder

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    I recently adopted a silky rooster that had a stroke. He was going to be culled. Kept him seperatly from everyone else incase of disease. Now enough time has passed and I let other chickens go up to his cage if they want. ( he can't walk, and I need to keep him seperatly to keep him safe from being attacked), well... For a while now I noticed my lil silver sea bright bantam rooster had an interest in him. Wasn't sure what was going on there but he seemed to really like him. Eventually I let the bantam be close to the handicapped rooster. Now the bantam chooses to spend 99% of his time with handicapped chicken. He's in love! Encourages him to eat, combes is feathers, lays with him, crows at him and he does... Try n mate with him. It's so weird! Why?? All he wants to do is be with the handicapped rooster. Cute n all, but just seems so strange. I figure it's a good thing so now my lone handicapped guy has company. Any ideas why this might be going on? The bantam has bantam hens that he could choose to spend his time with. And he is the only bantam rooster
     
  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Aside from being a bit odd, that actually is quite adorable.

    Are you completely sure the Silkie is a cockerel, not a pullet? Silkies can be very hard to sex! Has it crowed?

    I have, on occasion, had my roosters attempt to mount my capons (castrated cockerels), presumably because they neither act nor look like males. Sometimes Silkies (and in particular, I imagine, a handicapped Silkie) can be quite difficult to determine gender based on looks and even behavior alone. Your rooster may simply think the Silkie is a hen.

    I have also seen, after a fight occurred, dominant roosters mount the losers of the fight. But that tends to be more aggressive behavior and it would not make sense for a bird to be displaying both aggressive behavior as well as doing friendly things such as showing him food or laying near him.

    Either way, if they are enjoying themselves, I say leave them. Odd friendships are the best kind.
     
  3. LilJoe

    LilJoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I thought you couldn't fix roosters...... ⊙~⊙
     
  4. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    It's not common (in Western countries) anymore, but it is possible. Look at old cookbooks from the 30s, 40s, 50s, you'll see recipes for "capon" alongside things like broilers, roasters, etc. Since the testes are internal it's considered a riskier process than removal of the testes on a mammal. It's usually used to make better meat birds, but can also turn a loud, ornery rooster into a quiet, docile pet. My capons act much like any hen and retain a hen's small comb and wattle but still develop their beautiful saddle and sickle feathers and grow even larger than a typical cockbird. There are several Caponizing threads in the Meat Birds section of the forum and I'm always happy to answer questions if you are still curious about it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2016
  5. LilJoe

    LilJoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh ok,I didn't think it was possible
     
  6. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Like I said, it's tricky and definitely not for everybody - part of the reason it's rare to find someone who practices it. I taught myself using online and antique book guides but many people wish to have a mentor who can help them along. The testes are located inside the body, near the kidneys. Run your hand along a bird's sides until you find the place where the ribs meet the thigh. Bring your fingers together so they are pinching the backbone. Right below your fingers are the testes. To get to them you must go between the ribs and remove them with a tool designed for the process, such as a slotted spoon. It's not difficult but it is delicate and requires a heathy understanding of poultry anatomy and a strong stomach.
     
  7. LilJoe

    LilJoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    intresting, but I'm not doing it cx
     
  8. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Of course, I was just trying to explain the mechanics of how it was possible.
     
  9. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    I think it is sweet that the bantie roo looks after the silkie. Nothing wrong with that unless his attempt at mating, cause any injury to the silkie.
     
  10. LilJoe

    LilJoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know
     

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