Bare Spot - why?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by whudson, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. whudson

    whudson Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 5, 2009
    I'm brand new to chickens. We got four 18 month olds from a local.

    He said one didn't grow all her feathers back after molting, but I would like a second opinion.

    She is the smallest of the bunch, and seems to be bottom on pecking order.
    She is also timid at treat time. The others will gather around take hand outs, but she will just stand back and watch like an outsider.

    Any opinions?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    I've got one like that -- she sleeps next to the roo every night, so I blame him. I think it's not uncommon for this to happen if a roo is a little too rough on a hen.
     
  3. tonini3059

    tonini3059 [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Luv

    Nov 6, 2008
    Southwestern PA
    We had quite a few like that from our rooster!! They sell chicken saddles you can cover them with. Moodene sells some in the Everything else BST section.
     
  4. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Mar 25, 2008
    Virginia
    Yep! It's the roo that's doing it. A chicken saddle will protect her back. Farmer Kitty has a pattern listed to make one.
     
  5. KELLEY1

    KELLEY1 New Egg

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    Dec 28, 2008
    I am new to my chickens too,but have learned some just from watching them! I have 11 hens and a roo! Before my roo(Rocky) arrived my hens had bald spots on thier backs.I saw them pulling feathers from each other and eating them! Strange I thought,but what do I know! I imagine the moult will start soon...hope so!
     
  6. chazcarly

    chazcarly New Egg

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    Jan 4, 2009
    i have 3 reds and 6 black speckleds and all are hens and the reds are doing it to the other hens the same way. dose anybody know what to do?

    please help:([​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  7. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Mar 25, 2008
    Virginia
    Quote:If your hens are pulling the feathers off each other's backs and eating them, then they are lacking in protein. Hen's eat feathers when they don't get enough protein. Try feeding something to them that is high in protein, like black-oiled sunflower seeds.
     
  8. Portia

    Portia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 29, 2008
    South Central PA
    Looks like she was a favorite of one of his roosters. That can happen if there is a low hen to rooster ratio, or if the rooster has selected a favorite; especially if the roo has sharp nails and spurs.
     
  9. chazcarly

    chazcarly New Egg

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    Jan 4, 2009
    what if i have no roo. from what i can see it seems like my reds are pulling the fethers out of my other breeds. the reds have no place where the fethers are being riped out. some of the other birds even get to the point where they are bleeding pretty bad. than when the feathers start to come in they get ripped out again.. i have even seen some of the other breeds doing it ti themselves and to each other can anyone tell me what is going on ?

    can anyone help ?

    PS i am only 14 years old and love chickens![​IMG]
     
  10. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    Quote:Feed them a high protein supplement to make sure they're getting all that they need. That should stop the feather picking and eating. I use fish meal. Some people are afraid that will taint the taste of the eggs but so far it hasn't. You could also feed them a higher protein chicken feed and make sure they have plenty of calcium available to make up for what isn't in the feed. Or cook for them -- they love eggs, hamburger, turkey, sausage, etc. Supply them with big juicy bugs (crickets and grasshoppers are among the favorites).

    I wish I could say I was only 14 yrs old, but I do love my chickens!
     

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