Barred rock and cream legbar hens crossed with a wheaten Ameraucana rooster??

Marme

Chirping
May 20, 2016
69
48
96
Ok, so I’m very fascinated by genetics and I have just set 9 eggs in the incubator that are a result of two hens crossed with my wheaten Ameraucana rooster. I have 5 barred rock eggs and 4 cream legbar eggs started. Can either of these crossed be sexed at birth or even once feathering starts coming in because of the barred genes in both the hens?? Any feedback on what to expect would be helpful. A friend hatched out some of the same eggs for me and she got yellow chicks from the cream legbar and black chicks with white spots on their heads from the barred rock. What would the indications be for both crosses on male vs female??
 

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sylviethecochin

Free Ranging
Jun 14, 2017
5,234
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Central PA
In both cases, male chicks should have white headspots, and females should not. It'd be much harder to see against the yellow background, though.

I have read that most Ameraucanas are fast-feathering, and so are cream legbars. If that's the case, you might be able to feather-sex the offspring; the roosters should feather in slightly more quickly. If your boy is an EE, or has EE heritage, he might feather in slowly, which should leave the male offspring feathering in significantly more quickly than the females.*

*these feathering predictions are based on the breeding outcomes of my own flock and should not be taken as an absolute guarantee. All information is provided for general informative purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional advice. (
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Marme

Chirping
May 20, 2016
69
48
96
In both cases, male chicks should have white headspots, and females should not. It'd be much harder to see against the yellow background, though.

I have read that most Ameraucanas are fast-feathering, and so are cream legbars. If that's the case, you might be able to feather-sex the offspring; the roosters should feather in slightly more quickly. If your boy is an EE, or has EE heritage, he might feather in slowly, which should leave the male offspring feathering in significantly more quickly than the females.*

*these feathering predictions are based on the breeding outcomes of my own flock and should not be taken as an absolute guarantee. All information is provided for general informative purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional advice. (View attachment 2029066)
If the legbar chicks hatch out and make it then I’ll look really closely for the spot on the head. Daddy is a wheaten Ameraucana but I hadn’t heard about the fast feathering. I do know that the males feathering comes in darker than the females so it should be interesting what these do!
 
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