barred rock roo?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by BentonBirds, Jul 10, 2016.

  1. BentonBirds

    BentonBirds New Egg

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    Jun 13, 2016
    Benton Harbor MI
    Our barred rocks are about 8-10 weeks old. We are new chicken owners and would love to know how many roos we have!
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  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Everyone I can see here is a pullet.
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    works for me
     
  4. BentonBirds

    BentonBirds New Egg

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    Jun 13, 2016
    Benton Harbor MI
    here is a couple more pics of my girls (hopefully) What does it mean when they have a black stripe on their legs/feet?
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  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    All pullets.

    The dark wash of color on the legs indicates they have one barring gene, meaning they're female.
     
  6. BentonBirds

    BentonBirds New Egg

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    Jun 13, 2016
    Benton Harbor MI
    so does a white stripe mean male?
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    In theory, yes.

    some basics on barring.....

    In barred Rocks and other black barred birds, the bird is genetically black. The barring gene gives the white "bars" of color on the base coat of black.

    The barring gene is sex linked. Males give a copy to each of their offspring, regardless of gender. Females only give a copy to their male offspring.

    So, a male chick gets two copies of the gene, one from each parent. A female only gets one, from her father.

    Having two copies, the male has twice as much light to dark ratio as a female. That's why folks say you can sex barred Rocks by color. Males are lighter overall.

    The two copies of the barring gene also connects to lighten the leg color on males. The one copy on females gives them the darker wash of color.

    The above is all how genetics work in theory. In practice, especially in hatchery birds, it's not 100%. Hatcheries don't breed for good pure barring, so you can't count on it. It's more like a general rule of thumb, something to keep in mind and take into account when looking at the whole bird (comb, stance, leg thickness, shape, etc).
     
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