Barring gene

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by tazcat70, May 14, 2009.

  1. tazcat70

    tazcat70 I must be crazy!

    Ok please tell me if I understand this correctly.

    1. Barred rooster + unbarred hen = not a sex link
    2. Barred hens + unbarred roo = Barred roo chicks unbarred pullets


    If you do the barred roos, what % will be barred?

    Thanks,
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2009
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Barred roo X unbarred hen = 50% barred; 50% not.


    All barred birds, regardless of gender will only have one copy of the barring gene and will not be sexable based on barring colour.
     
  3. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Barred hen + unbarred roo DOES = barred roo chicks & unbarred pullet chicks...therefore they ARE sexlinked!
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Hey Kelly, read the question again.

    Tazcat wanted to verify that BARRED ROOS and NON-BARRED HENS do not create a sex-link, (which they do not) and that barred hens and non-barred roos give barred cockerels and non-barred pullets (which is also correct).
     
  5. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Ok, I was just verifying the sex-linked part...guess I skipped over the other part. [​IMG]
     
  6. tazcat70

    tazcat70 I must be crazy!

    Thanks!!!
     
  7. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If the rooster is purebreed for barring B/B then all chicks will be barred. Else 50%
     
  8. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    Quote:Why do all males only have one barring gene? Isn't it only the female that is hemizygous for barring?
     
  9. Krys109uk

    Krys109uk Chillin' With My Peeps

    Why do all males only have one barring gene? Isn't it only the female that is hemizygous for barring?

    Usually a purebred barred male might be expected to be carrying two barring genes. So if he is crossed with a non barred hen then all of his offspring, whichever gender, would inherit one barring gene from him. From the mother the male offspring would also inherit & non barred gene on their Z chromosome & the female offspring would inherit a w. [​IMG]
     
  10. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    Quote:Usually a purebred barred male might be expected to be carrying two barring genes. So if he is crossed with a non barred hen then all of his offspring, whichever gender, would inherit one barring gene from him. From the mother the male offspring would also inherit & non barred gene on their Z chromosome & the female offspring would inherit a w. [​IMG]

    A female is either B- (barred) or b- (not barred).

    A male may be BB (barred), Bb (barred), bB (barred) or bb (not barred).

    A male that is BB when mated with a female that is b- will produce 100% barred offspring; males will be Bb and females B-.

    A male that is Bb (or bB) when mated with a female that is b- will produce 50% barred offspring and 50% non-barred offspring; males will be either Bb or bb and females will be either B- or b- all with equal likelihood.
     

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