Barring genes...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Godiva, Jun 27, 2008.

  1. Godiva

    Godiva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a whole bunch of barred cochins (std) some are blue and some are black and some have very little barring so I am not even sure if they are barred. I have noticed that some of them have very marked barring and some have much less distinct barring. What does this mean for the chicks... If I keep a barred blue roo what colours will the chicks be ... I know that a barred roo will always pass on the barring but the background colour? One of the roos is very dark with very little barring... what will his chicks look like? Just trying to educate myself a little and you guys are a great resource. I guess I need to get some pics of these guys and put them on here. I really need some help figuring out which of these roos to keep.... Some of them are gigantic and feathered in really late (the really distint barred guys) and others are smaller ...
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I may be wrong and I'm sure someone will correct me, but the blue gene works the same even with barring involved. Blue bred to blue gives you blue, black or splash. If you breed blue to black, you get some of each.
     
  3. Godiva

    Godiva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Colorado
    Thanks Cynthia, I kind of thought that might be the case. I would love to know what folks have to say about the very distinct barring versus very indistinct barring?
     
  4. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Barring has a dose effect. It means there is a visible difference in a bird having one or two of the barring genes. This is why barred hens normally are much "darker" than roosters. (hens can only have one barred gene as it's a sex linked gene. Roosters can have either one or two of 'em)

    Rooster that are dark or have faint or sparse barring usually have only one barring gene, if those are bred with a black hen, half of the offspring will be barred, the rest being solid blacks. BTW a barred chicken is simply a solid black chicken with the barring gene.

    Barring is also affected by various other genes. Some genes will have an side effect of either improving the barring or worsening it. One example is K- sex linked slow feathering gene, this makes the feathers grow out really slowly but this also has the "side effect" of making the barring much crispier and cleaner- that is why your slower feathering ones turned out to have more distinct barring. Keep and breed those if you want chicks with better barring. Normal or fast growing feathers make for less even barring either with unclear borders to the bars or make them more chevron shaped. Cuckoo birds are good example of this- they are simply barred birds with fast growing feathers.

    Blue also has an effect on barring, they normally make the barring less crisp, to varying degrees. Be careful, while there are blue barred birds, there are also non-blue barred birds that look "bluish" due to barring, if the feathers are fast growing the white bars can be "sprayed" across the whole feather, diluting the black parts to a paler color.
     
  5. tx_dane_mom

    tx_dane_mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 23, 2007
    SE Texas
    Quote:Wouldn't this result in the pullets being solid black and the roos again being barred, thus as day olds/early on you have sex links again.
    Just wanting to make sure I have it right in my head.
    Thanks,
    Kristi
     
  6. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Wouldn't this result in the pullets being solid black and the roos again being barred, thus as day olds/early on you have sex links again.
    Just wanting to make sure I have it right in my head.
    Thanks,
    Kristi

    Close, it's the other way around- for this example it would be a black rooster over a barred hen(this would give all barred sons and black daughters).

    It may help keep it straight by thinking "the mother always passes the sex linked trait to her sons". Edited to add, maybe it may be easier to remember black sex links are out of RIRooster and Barred hens..

    Roosters OTOH pass on sex linked traits to offspring of both sexes equally.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2008
  7. tx_dane_mom

    tx_dane_mom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 23, 2007
    SE Texas
    Ok...so...if you breed a barred cochin ROO to blue hens you get theoretically blue and black barred offspring.
    And if you breed a Blue cochin ROO to barred hens you would get barred boys and blue girls?
    Or did I mess that all up?
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Correct. In both sexes.

    Quote:This one will be a sex linked mating. Sons would all be barred, daughters solid colored. Blue is not sex linked so it goes to both sexes, irregardless which parent was blue. So half of the sons would be blue barred, half of the daughters would be(solid) blue.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2008
  9. Godiva

    Godiva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Awesome info Kev! Thank you for your help. I was wondering what was going on with the different kinds of barring. SO a late feathering barred roo is preferable to an early feathering dark barred roo - if you are wanting barred offspring. Otherwise I could keep a dark blurry barred roo and have some offspring that are not barred! Is that right? I was not really wanting to go into barred cochins so that helps me with choosing which roo to keep.
     
  10. Barnyard

    Barnyard Addicted to Quack

    Aug 5, 2007
    Southwest Georgia
    [​IMG] I am lost.

    I have a bantam barred roo and a bantam black hen. What will I come up with. I want to keep these 2 as a breeding pair.


    edited to add that they are cochins
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2008

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