Beeesssss

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by rancher hicks, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 28, 2009
    Syracuse, NY
    I want to put in a hive. While I know some things I need to know what to order. Bushy Bee sends me e-mails and I'd like to buy one but which kit? Something like the "Garden Hive". Will that have everything I need to set it up? I know they have the kit with a bunch of stuff but do I need all that?

    Any ideas on how hard it will be to get someone to come and service it. I was hoping to get someone to come and take care of it in exchange for some honey. It's just me and the Mrs. so we don't need a lot of it.

    Any ideas on what kinda deal to make? Ex. two pints for us and the rest for them or something along that line.

    With the 8 frame "Garden hive" will that produce a lot of honey? I would of course expect to buy the bees to get things started of course.

    Are bees expensive to buy?

    Thanks for the information.

    Rancher
     
  2. CYGChickies

    CYGChickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
    Where I am, bees cost about $75 for a startup package of bees. The first year they will make very little if any honey for you. That need a certain amount for themselves through the winter. If you purchase the garden hive kit from Brushy Mountain you will still need wax foundation and possibly a smoker depending on the kit you choose. A feeder is also a good idea to have since you will have to feed your bees from time to time. A hive tool and bee brush are good things to have as well. If the person who works the bees does not have a suit or veil then that's another investment.

    My hive and bees are coming in Spring and all together it comes to roughly $500. They're pricey to start but not as pricey as cattle would be I suppose. Fresh honey is great however and bees are fascinating creatures.

    CYG
     
  3. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    What about the Bushy set up for $195? That has a lot of stuff with it. Wouldn't that have everything I need? Except the bees of course.
     
  4. seismic wonder2

    seismic wonder2 I got mad ninja skills

    Feb 3, 2007
    san diego ca
    For a beginner with absolutely NOTHING, you will need.

    1 Hive body,(also called brood box where the queen lays eggs and raise baby bees)(9inches thick) either 8 frames or 10 frames...(I like the 8 frame, its a little smaller but also lighter if you're not real strong)
    Queen excluder (keeps the queen from laying eggs in your honey supply)
    1 "Super" (6 inches thick) again I recommend 8 frames (the super is where the bees put YOUR honey...)
    frames to hold the wax (8 for the body or brood box and 8 supers)
    Hive stand
    Hive bottom(I use a screened bottom to help ventillation I live in San Diego-- bloody hot out here!)
    Hive inner cover
    Hive top (tin coverd to be water proof)

    bee smoker (smoke calms the bees and helps keep them from flying all over)
    hive tool, (basically a pribar to open the hive and separate and lift the frames for inspection)

    Feeder (starting a new hive, the bees will need sugar water/honey water to eat while being established and find natural food)

    Bee Suit ( it gives the newbee an extra layer of protection and that keeps the beekeeper calm---that keeps the bees calm...)
    bee veil either the customary hat with veil attached or it can be zippered to the bee suit.
    bee gloves NON VENTED!!! that come all the way to the elbow. As you become familiar with the bees most people don't even use gloves
    I recommend the NON vented gloves because sometimes a bee may be able to work her stinger between the vent mesh and get you.

    bees and a queen

    finally read every book you can get your hands on with a title something like "beginner beekeeping"

    Usually, the beginner kits from brushy bee and the like will supply every thing in the list above EXCEPT the bees, Those cost extra and need to be ordered AFTER you have the hive built and setup.

    If you're not handy with tools they will ship pre-build hives for a huge extra cost...I recommend you learn how to use a hammer, glue and a paint brush.

    BUT BUT BUT BUT!!!!
    BEFORE you go and buy all that stuff make sure you are legally allowed to keep bees on your property!!!!!!
    Department of agriculture should be a place to start.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011
  5. CYGChickies

    CYGChickies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
    The Brushy Mountain kits come with almost everything. I would check it against the list just provided by seismic wonder2 and add what is missing. Contacting Brushy Mountain and asking them isn't a bad idea. As far as a book I HIGHLY recommend Beekeeping for Dummies as it had a ton of information on bees, hives, honey and basically everything you need and want to know about honeybees. As far as someone to work them that might be harder to find, but ditto on making sure you're allowed and beware of sprayed pesticides and any other chemical of your hive is in or near commercial crops. We are nowhere near any other crop farmers and our only "neighbors" have horses and donkeys only so no danger to the bees or their honey.

    CYG
     
  6. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Couldn't I assume since I have chickens I could have bees? I don't use pesticides on my property. I was really hopeing to avoid all the "lists" of things by having someone who has bees recommend a kit. I have research some on bees, but Lord have mercy it's alot more than chickens. I really want them to pollinate my vegetable garden. Not so much for the honey. I figure on hive should be enough for my garden. We do have a few people in the area who sell honey and there is a club too.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  7. seismic wonder2

    seismic wonder2 I got mad ninja skills

    Feb 3, 2007
    san diego ca
    I live in San Diego...THey have regulations on how many times you can pee in a day...
    Chicken regs and bee regs are very different.
    You could have a hive in your yard for years and no one would ever care...until a neighbor gets stung then the world ends.

    around here bees have to be 100 feet from any road and 600 feet from any dwelling where people are.
     
  8. Smitty's Farm

    Smitty's Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 24, 2007
    St Clair County, Il
    You should get in touch with your local beekeeping association and join. Usually the majority of the members are very experienced beekeepers that have been doing it for eons. Most the time they love to share their experiences. At least that is what we experienced w/ our local organization. Our association has a system that the more experienced beekeepers will mentor the new members. They get the news out about beginning beekeeping classes or info that's happening in the beekeeping world. The first thing you need to do is see if you are even allowed to have them. Your beekeeping association will be able to tell you all the rules and regulations if you can't find it. It's great you are researching now, so you will be ready to jump right in there this spring.
     
  9. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    When I was a kid, 10 or 11 years old, I made the mistake of mentioning in the hearing of my grand father that it would be fun to have a hive of bees. Next thing I knew we had forty something.

    I was not much fun robbing those things in the Georgia heat. I'm like you though, I'd like to have one now to pollinate stuff if I could get somebody to get the honey.
     
  10. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    I have a row of Rose of Sharon trees and they were loaded with flowers. I don't think I say more than one or two bees on them. One year I pollinated squash by hand. I really need bees in this yard. We have three acres or thereabouts. I will call around and check to see if there might be a problem having a hive.
     

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