Bees nest

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by DaveK88, May 3, 2011.

  1. DaveK88

    DaveK88 Out Of The Brooder

    65
    2
    41
    Mar 23, 2011
    Killingly Ct.
    I have a bees nest in my coop. I don't want to use chemical bee killer inside the coop. Anyone have any suggestions on how to get rid of them? The nest is still small but getting bigger. Thanks.
     
  2. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

    4,726
    139
    281
    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    Don't kill the bees! They do more good than harm. Contact your county extension office, even your local yellow pages, for beekeepers who will remove the hive safely. While there usually are professional companies you'd have to pay, you may also find private bee enthusiasts who will do it for free.
     
  3. Manuelandthegirls

    Manuelandthegirls Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Jan 24, 2011
    What kind of bees are they? If they are honey bees, don't kill them. If there is a beekeeper in your area they will remove them for you.
     
  4. Baymule

    Baymule Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,106
    97
    226
    Jul 1, 2010
    Northeast Texas
    bees or wasps?
     
  5. Airplaneguy57

    Airplaneguy57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    119
    0
    109
    Feb 23, 2010
    Rio Medina Texas
    If these wasp or bees( down here they could be Africanized bees) just put some dishwashing liquid in a big plastic glass. Fill with hot water. Once they are back on the nest throw the liquid on the pest. They drop like stones. The soap is not toxic to the birds but the bees die. Repeat as often as necessary. The reason for the plastic glass is after throwing run. Never run with a glass.
     
  6. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

    471
    6
    118
    Mar 22, 2011
    Omaha, NE
    Are you certain that they are bees? I've never known bees to nest in any kind of coop/barn/carport/garage/house eaves, so it really sounds more like paper wasps instead.

    What does the nest look like? What color and size are the insects? Do they have hair on their bodies or are they smooth and glossy? Fat bodies, or slim-waisted?

    From "nest is small and getting bigger" I would hazard that those are paper wasps. Do a web search on what the nest looks like. Black & yellow are European paper wasps--black & red-brown are American paper wasps.
     
  7. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,168
    30
    201
    Jul 6, 2010
    Oxford NY
    I suspect you're giving bees a bad name--what you undoubtedly have are wasps or hornets. As a former bee keeper I was always getting calls from people asking me to remove "bee's" nests only to find they were white faced hornet's nests. At any rate, assuming they are hornets/wasps, if they are within reach wait until after dark, cover the nest with a big bag and knock it down into the bag, close it quickly and burn it. The only alternative is to spray with wasp/hornet spray after dark but that contains a petroleum product that may harm the chickens since they certainly will eat the downed insects.
     
  8. DaveK88

    DaveK88 Out Of The Brooder

    65
    2
    41
    Mar 23, 2011
    Killingly Ct.
    I'm sorry i should have been more clear, they are in fact hornets. the only rerason they got in is because the coop is not 100% finished yet and the windows are not covered. My girls will be in there full time this weekend after it is finished. Thank you all for your response and ideas.
     
  9. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

    471
    6
    118
    Mar 22, 2011
    Omaha, NE
    If the girls are not in there yet, I would consider going the chemical approach and removing all the bodies and nest parts before moving the chickens in. I've only ever dealt with paper wasps and yellowjackets, who can be nasty enough, but I heard that hornets can be quite dangerous.

    If they're like wasps, the go back to the nest at night. I'd hit them in the coolest part of the day when they're most sluggish--very, very early morning. The chemical wasp/hornet sprays have a quick knock-down and kill, but they could still sting multiple times while dying so you don't want to be anywhere that they may fall. They can be very protective of the nest, and unlike bees, who only sting once, wasps and hornets can get you many times.

    I was stung three times in 6 weeks one summer by paper wasps, and now I kill all colonies of wasps and yellowjackets near my house or areas frequented by my family. All bees, honeybees, bumblebees, mason bees, and mud dauber wasps are very welcome, but the nasties are DEAD. I didn't enjoy my steroid and antihistimine treatments, nor the intense heat, swelling, and itching that came from the multiple stings.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by