Believe impacted gizzards on two of my ladies.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by maxdecphoenix, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. maxdecphoenix

    maxdecphoenix Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi folks, as the title states, I've noticed a soft, enlarged, bulb on the right side of two hen's breasts. After referring to this book and a few pictures I'm pretty certain that's what it is. My ladies free-range and in addition to that portion of the diet, they have also pellet food. And that's where I think I've gone wrong. They don't each much of their pellatage, and I noticed this after switching them off brood mix, but I chalked it up to texture and not being as appetizing as creepy crawlers, frogs, berries and whatever else they pick out of the ground. So I kinda wrote it off.

    Their afternoon scratch snacks include birdseed, bread, sometimes pizza crusts, uncooked grits, occasional fruit, and, what I really think I've erroneously been feeding them: (uncooked) puffed wheat cereal. They love those puffs. I haven't been giving them additional mineral grit (besides re-feeding their used shells) because I assumed they would regulate that themselves as needed. I thought there was mineral additive in the pellets as well to prevent this. I used to give oyster shells and such when my mom kept chicks, but her's were cooped.


    The two afflicted hens (a light brown leghorn and the other is a black rock mix of some sort) don't seem any worse for wear despite this tumoresque protrusion that is now roughly the size of half an orange. Laying is normal. Temperament & energy is normal. I was under the impression from reading, they show fatigue rather quickly.

    The other 4 hens show virtually no signs of this affliction that my hand or eye can tell, despite, for all intents, the exact same diet (give or take a worm). I thought their diet was fine. They get a nice mix of seeds, berries, compost bin insects, the only grass I've seen them eat was whatever they pick up scratching around. I've never intentionally fed them straight grass.

    I intend on switching them off the pellets and back to the grain they were brooded on (despite the ducks being so wasteful of it). I'd like it to take back a larger part of their diet. What do you guys think about their current snack choices? and would you add supplemental grit? Do you believe they are getting too much starch/fiber? Or should I just moisten it up more? How do you guys prepare your slop buckets. I've started nuking breads in water to make it softer and not so dry.


    Comments welcome.

    I've read some treatments already. I'm going to have to go with the yogurt/oil mix. I don't have the money right now for vet bills and meds :(
     
  2. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What you are describing is their crop. The crop will be full during day and should be empty in morning(check before they have eaten). The gizzard(this is where grit is stored) is the muscle that grinds up the food for it to be digested.
     
  3. maxdecphoenix

    maxdecphoenix Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 25, 2013
    Yes, I meant crop. I caught it after I posted this question, but my internet has been having issues and I was unable to edit it.

    As for time, I had to move the birds last night due to rain (they sleep in a small tree), that's when I noticed the second bird. This was around 9pm, roughly 3 hours after they had went to bed. I'll make a note to check them right before they come down in the morning, and observe their condition.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble Premium Member

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    Quit feeding them pizza crust, bread, puffed wheat cereal and all that other junk. Feed them what they're supposed to eat for a proper diet; layer feed.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I've never seen a crop or gizzard get an impaction from anything other than long grass or foreign objects. Not saying that's the only way it can happen, just that that's what I have seen.

    -Kathy
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    The items below are from the gizzrd of a peacock that died from blackhead. His gizzard was not blocked, but it probably would eventually become blocked from picking up stuff like this.
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    -Kathy
     
  7. heidisue

    heidisue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Check them in the early am, it sounds like a normal crop. The crop can easily get to half the size of an orange while they eat. It should go back down at night and then fill again as they eat during the day.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I agree... And if it doesn't just withhold food and let them have nothing but water and it should resolve on it's own.

    -Kathy
     

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