Beloved dog attacked beloved chickens. UPDATE-BOTH GONE pg 5 :-(

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by egglicious, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. egglicious

    egglicious Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I made a dumb mistake and let my chickens freerange with my dogs outside while I went to the store. When I returned my little shi tzu was inside the chicken coop with two chickens cornered and there were feathers everywhere. He had ripped out their feathers and bitten them. Luckily the others were unharmed, although obviously pretty spooked.

    The one that looked worse was actually in decent spirits but the other is in shock. I brought them both inside, sprayed blue coat on them and gave them food and water in their old brooder. They are twelve weeks old. I hope they make it through the night.

    What can I do? The little dog burrowed under the fence. Tomorrow we are going to secure it very well, but will my chickens be forever stressed out? I don't want to give my dog or my chickens away. The dog was here first, anyway.

    I am rambling because I am also in shock. Please send healing vibes, pray, or whatever you believe in, send it to my chickens. They need it tonight.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  2. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Sounds like you are doing everything right, good luck, you are in my thoughts.

    [​IMG]

    Give the chickens a few days, they will be fine (the unharmed ones). Try not to return the injured until the wounds are sealed up.

    If you have time besides securing the run/coop you should also train the dog.
     
  3. egglicious

    egglicious Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thank you so much. Any references for good dog/chicken training? He is a rescue and came to us very damaged. He has really transformed since we got him but I am just at a loss what to do to fix this. He barks at them a lot and I don't want them stressed..
     
  4. mc08daniel

    mc08daniel Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi your chickens should be just fine! They are the most vibrant animal I know of getting hurt and healing very quickly and nice. I have had dogs arrass my chickens and bounce back very fast. Not just 3 weeks ago I had a coon rip a hole in the back of my lil easter egger rooster head...I mean down to the skull! kept it clean and it has all healed up nicely. Now your dog on the other hand will want to run the chickens from now on...best way to stop it I found, is a lil dog electric collar or electric fence around your chicken yard for a lil while till the dog learns not to mess with the chickens...
     
  5. UncleTommy

    UncleTommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ooo, my pug has been sitting under my brooder like she is just waiting for a snack to hop out. I've been trying to train her that the chicks are not nummies. Today while the chicks were foraging, I was holding my pug and they would come over, then run away, then they got a little closer and my pug wanted to pounce....then one of the chicks pecked her right on a face fold! I almost let her go because I was laughing so hard, but I think she figured out that they aren't going to be an easy meal.
     
  6. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    [​IMG] I have a similar situation I have a doxie that got two of my chickens. We put up an additional fence between where the chickens are and the dogs part of the yard. We had space enough for that, even if you don't my suggestion would be seperation, and training. Training has only been moderately helpful for us, only while being directly supervised and still w/ a fence between them, Tucker won't chase or try to gain access, but if any commit suicide and go into his yard I have no doubts about the outcome. Good luck and stay vigilant and you will lessen the chances. [​IMG]
     
  7. Moabite

    Moabite Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2010
    Utah
    Seems that this happens to a lot of people. My own dog broke into the coop and killed off most of my first flock. I learned a lot, my dog learned a lot and now she helps protect the chickens.

    I hope your chickens heal and your dog reforms. Be diligent in your predator proofing. If you miss a spot you will find out soon enough. Good luck!
     
  8. Newwell

    Newwell Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG] I'm really sorry about your chickens. I hope they will be better soon. [​IMG] But what scares me is that I have a Shih Tzu & a Lhasa Apso, too. The Shih Tzu is "really intense" when I put my babies (3 weeks) out in their pen. The Lhasa is curious, gets bored, & then hops in our lap or in a chair. Our Shih Tzu has to stay tied because I don't trust him. I definitely wouldn't leave him alone with the chickens once they are housed outside. Does anyone have any suggestions about how to introduce them & not be afraid that he will attack them when my back is turned?
     
  9. egglicious

    egglicious Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you all so much for your kind words and suggestions. I feel I am in shock tonight, just like my sweet chicken. You all have really helped.
     
  10. FourPawz

    FourPawz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's going to be ok. Your birds should recover. You do, however, need to train your pooch. You need to put Fido on a leash attached to a collar, NOT a harness and, well away but in sight of the birds, you need to say his name, and when he looks at you, you need to immediately give him a really good treat. Something high quality, like a pinch of lunch meat or leftover meat. You need to do this repeatedly, and it's going to take a while to get him to take his eyes off the distracting birds reliably. As you progress, you can inch closer to the birds, but if the stimulation is too much, back off from them. You want the dog to succeed. Your goal is to be able to sit right at the coop, and have him watch you instead of the birds.

    You're desensitizing him by this conditioning.
     

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