Benefits of Getting Pullets Rather than Chicks - Need Some Advice!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jessicagray, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. jessicagray

    jessicagray Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all!

    I'm a beginner and was hoping to get some advice. I want to raise laying hens. I have the option of purchasing two pullets for $30 at 2 months old with the guarantee that the chickens sold to me are female. Or, should I risk it and get $3 chicks. I don't know what I would do with a rooster, I have no plans to breed.

    Thank you for your advice!!
     
  2. jk47

    jk47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If the person your buying from has a good reputation for selling good healthy pullets then go for it. You well save time and money
    But if you want the fun of chicks then buy sexlink chicks save the trouble of raising roosters either way
     
  3. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome! I must say, the pepto pink chicken avitar is disturbing- but funny! Anyway, those are expensive pullets! The problem with just two is, that can easily become just one in a big hurry. It only takes one dog, coon, whatever. It is always better to have a trio and always awesome to have a rooster if permitted. Chicks only happen if you let fertilized eggs incubate. Roosters are great defenders, predator and trespasser alarms and "never fail" alarm clocks, no satellite or electric needed. I have lost some birds this year but still have 25, 5 are roosters. I can't imagine life without their voices every morning, just sayin'. [​IMG] ~JPB
     
  4. jessicagray

    jessicagray Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, so make sure to ask him questions like "How long have you been raising chickens?", etc? Make sure he's reputable and reliable. Thank you :)
     
  5. jessicagray

    jessicagray Out Of The Brooder

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    Lol! It's for breast cancer awareness! I made a thread about it but it didn't catch, I did one though!: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...r-breast-cancer-awareness-month#post_15964905

    Okay so I should get three? I'm just so afraid of doing something wrong so that's why I thought two would be a good start. Apparently not! I think that's great advice! I kept my neighbors in mind in not getting roosters! lol I'm new to the neighborhood, so I don't want to be that crazy chicken lady too soon! lol Thank you for your advice! :)
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Pro - faster eggs.
    Con - starting with possible pests/disease.

    The cost aspect evens out, either you pay for the equipment/feed to raise the chicks, or you pay someone else to raise them.

    Asking "How long have you been raising chickens?"...will not garner any valuable info, asking how they deal with lice, mites, respiratory illness and Mareks might.
     
  7. jessicagray

    jessicagray Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you, I started a new thread to ask about what sort of questions I should I ask a breeder. I think your's are a good place to start.
     
  8. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, get 3. Good for the breast cancer, the pink chicken. I am a colon cancer survivor, just tested clean this year.@aart gave good advice too, read his signature about the chicken math. Look at my pics in my signature of the hen that lived through a fox attack. I lost 7 other birds this year, one to a coon and 6 to weasels. make sure they are safe from the little murderers like weasels and minks too. Most definitely ask breeder about Mareks, respiratory diseases, lice, mites etc. They should allow you to check out their coop. If it is dirty, smelly, the waterers are green or unpleasant, don't get them. If you fall in love with chickens like the rest of us, you'll be getting chicks next time anyway. [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Happy chickening! ~JPB
     
  9. fishandchix1

    fishandchix1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you're just a beginner, BYC is a great place to learn! Good luck!
     
  10. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I started on Labor Day with four pullets that hatched May 1. Had my first egg six days later. I'm still very new to this, so I'm no expert, but I think to start and learn, pullets was the best way to go. For as young as the pullets you mentioned are, that seems pretty steep, but I guess that's not really for me to say. But I would guess you still won't be seeing your first eggs until the days lengthen in the spring. Still a lot more raising to do than not before production. I paid $10 each for my birds at point of lay. Maybe a little lucky to find that deal, but $15 at 8 weeks seems pricey.

    That said, again, I started with four, and I'm a little concerned because some unfortunate chicken math (subtraction) has me down to two birds 6 weeks later. One, I suspect to a burning bush I was ignorant of (they are all being eliminated) and the other two an overly adventurous lakenvelder taking a walk in the standing corn at the edge of the yard.

    If your coop supports more birds, I would say three is the bare minimum. Four was a perfect start for me.

    Also, I would ask the breeder if he's wrong about the bird being a pullet if he will swap you for a properly sexed bird when it becomes apparent. If he's not willing to stand by what he sold you, I would be looking for a new supplier. Chicken or otherwise.
     

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