Best breeds to buy

sybonbon

Songster
5 Years
Jan 9, 2016
558
942
221
My SLW has never been a bully. She gets along with my flock. She lays beautiful big eggs. My EE's lay huge eggs and at least 5 days a week.
 

Tervuren

Songster
Aug 30, 2020
135
260
146
Southern Idaho
I love my EE, would totally recommend! She's a solid layer, sweet, and you've got to love those fluffy cheeks! I would also suggest Australorps; great layers and their iridescent black feathering is beautiful.
These two are not likely to be in a feed store, but on the off chance they are you should go for them! I have a Silver Dorking, who is the silliest little thing. She's a total lap chicken, but hates to be picked up lol. She is very agile despite the short legs. My Cream Legbar is quite inquisitive, she's the type to hop on my shoulder for the view. The breed is autosexing and lays blue eggs-what more could you ask for?
All four of these gals did great during the weeks of triple digit heat this summer. Despite loving my Bielefelder, I'm not getting another. She's so big, I worried about her all summer. Definitely a breed that is better suited for summers that only reach the 80s....
 

MysteryChicken

Unique minded, open minded Chicken Lover
Premium Feather Member
May 31, 2018
28,364
56,989
1,141
East, Tawas Michigan
I'm not that picky, unless they're high Production hybrids, blank white birds, or with ginormous combs, & wattles.


I'd suggest checking out Meyer's hatchery.

Good winter layers in my experience are: Brahmas, Orpingtons, Marans, Easter Eggers, & Silkies.

Apparently from what I've read, Salmon Faverolles are decent winter layers as well.
 

Farmgirl1878

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Mar 17, 2017
930
2,065
307
Piketon, Ohio
I have seven hens and five six-month old Brahmas. My hens, in pecking order, are a Salmon Faverolle, a black Jersey Giant, a BLRW, a Speckled Sussex, two Easter Eggers, and a Blue Cochin. The EEers are not affectionate in that they don’t sit on my lap, but they are very chatty with me and will carry on a conversation for minutes at a time. My SF is a tiny package of sass. And she will go “all rooster” when challenged by the other girls, regardless of size. She’s also very affectionate, verbal, and fun to watch. The blue Cochin loves to hang with me, is always underfoot, and is far and away, the most beautiful. The SS adopted all five of the Brahmas and did an awesome job raising them. She loves to nap on my lap and scratches through any pile of leaves. The BJG is my co-alpha and lays small brown eggs consistently, complains loudly when I don’t give her treats instantly, and is very independent. The BLRW, who is a year younger than the other hens, is feisty, curious, fearless, and always looking to rumble. The five Brahma pullets are almost a flock within the flock and are all lovey-dovey and learning fast. I’d have any of the breeds again, maybe with the exception of the Wyandottes.

All my girls are from Meyer Hatchery and Mt. Healthy Hatcheries.
 

bruceha2000

Addict
9 Years
Apr 19, 2012
17,213
72,725
1,262
NW Vermont
Definitely a breed that is better suited for summers that only reach the 80s....
Does that even exist in the Continental US? We hit well into the 90's and even "feels like" over 100°F this past summer. Can't get a whole lot more north than where I am!

Apparently from what I've read, Salmon Faverolles are decent winter layers as well.
Not in my experience. NONE of the breeds I have had laid other than their first winter. And that includes "winter layers" like Salmon Faverolles and Partridge Chantecler. I guess "your mileage may vary" is the key here.
 

sybonbon

Songster
5 Years
Jan 9, 2016
558
942
221
Does that even exist in the Continental US? We hit well into the 90's and even "feels like" over 100°F this past summer. Can't get a whole lot more north than where I am!


Not in my experience. NONE of the breeds I have had laid other than their first winter. And that includes "winter layers" like Salmon Faverolles and Partridge Chantecler. I guess "your mileage may vary" is the key here.
Or hours of light
 

bruceha2000

Addict
9 Years
Apr 19, 2012
17,213
72,725
1,262
NW Vermont
Yes, hours of light is presumably key to laying. "They" say you need 14 hours of at least low light to keep the hens laying through the winter. That doesn't quite add up though because my girls start back up about the end of February and we don't hit 12 hours of daylight until middle/end of March.
 

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