Best coop location for winter??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by sugar pants, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. sugar pants

    sugar pants Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 28, 2009
    WV
    My coop is movable. The original plan was to move it every week or so to give the girls fresh grass and not kill any yard.

    But that turned out to be a big pain (though I now have some REALLY healthy sections of yard from the early experiments) and we put it on concrete with a sand floor of the lower level/run.

    It's starting to cool off here, and I'd like to use this weekend to get the coop in the best spot for winter. My two options are:

    Near the house. This would protect them some from wind, make it easier to collect eggs in bad weather. Easy access to electricity for the water heater (and heat lamp, if needed). But...the house shades this area from the sun.

    We could put them in a nice sunny patch in the yard. This really might help to keep the coop warmer. It has a dark colored roof. It's farther away from the house though, and DH doesn't particularly want to run power down there. He will....but honestly, it would be kind of ghetto. Will the warmth from the sun be enough of a benefit to outweigh walking through weather for eggs and running electricity out there?

    Also, what are early signs of inadequate ventilation? Ventilation is easy in the summer but harder in the winter. I think I have it right, but since this will be our first time....I want to know what to look out for and fix the problem before it harms our birds!
     
  2. ShaggysGirl

    ShaggysGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 24, 2009
    Temperance, MI
    They say in the winter you should face the coop door south if possible.
    Not sure if the helps but it's all I got right now..lol
     
  3. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, if your coop is well built, and it sounds as though it is, and if the birds have a window, I'd recommend putting it where getting there and collecting eggs is convenient. After the most severe winter in 22 years and with a heavy snow load and -40C temps for two weeks, convenience has come to mean a lot! And about electricity- the longer the line you run, the more fragile the situation in regards to fire. If you must run an outdoor cord, get one long enough so that it is the only connection, and be sure it is rigged so that the ends remain dry and no vehicles run over the cord.

    Another thing to consider is the number of birds- if only a few, then ventilation and smell shouldn't be an issue- how many are there? And does your window open a bit if you need to ventilate on warmer days in fall and spring?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2009
  4. sugar pants

    sugar pants Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    39
    Apr 28, 2009
    WV
    We only have 3 birds. The coop is small though, it's a coverted dog house.

    There are pics here if they will help.

    http://jandcandme.wvblogger.com/?p=1180

    The winter mods include a plexiglass window for the front (door) window. The entire back 'staircase' area will be covered, top, back and sides. I'm thinking that will also keep drafts out of the chicken door. I have also considered placing the coop near to the dryer vent so that it blows on a side of the coop?? Definitely not in because if the moisture....and I'm not sure about it even blowing on the side either.
     
  5. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    With three widdle boids I'd have them huggle-close! Don't use use the dryer vents- the particulates will be a problem. Just give them lots of bedding and let them hunker down together. [​IMG]
     

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