Best gauge for hardware cloth

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by muircheartaigh, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. muircheartaigh

    muircheartaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

    What gauge of hardware cloth should I use for the bottom row around the perimeter of my run? I'm building a 15' x 20' run that runs around the east, west, and south sides of my coop. I've come across excellent material on the 18" horizontal lay at the bottom and how to thread the metal cloth together but was wondering what gauge would deter predators from trying to chew through it. As always, thank you to all who contribute.
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Use the heaviest you can find.
    There aren't that many different choices
     
  3. muircheartaigh

    muircheartaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

    19 gauge is the heaviest i've seen in my online searches of hardware stores in my area. Thanks!
     
  4. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    Most people use 19 gauge and that seems sufficient. It is widely available in your local hardware store or big box hardware store. Also, take a look on line. If you have a wire fence manufacturer within reasonably distance, you can usually get it much cheaper, and if you pick it up, you'll save on shipping. I found one in NJ about 45 miles from where I live. I will be able to get hardware cloth for 1/2 the price they charge at Lowes or Home Depot. BTW...you can also find hardware cloth in 16 gauge, but it seems like overkill and will cost you as much as 3 1/2 times the cost of 19 gauge.
     
  5. muircheartaigh

    muircheartaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

    19 gauge seems to be the accepted consensus. $25/roll at Home Hardware in my hometown according to my brother. How deep do most people set their fenceposts? 18", 24", 30", or 36"?
     
  6. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    18" minimum, 24" maximum is what I have been reading. Some just backfill with dirt, but some put down some rock and pour in some quickcrete, then put the post in and backfill with dirt. If you use the rock and quickcrete, go the 24" since the first few insches will be the rock and quickcrete. BTW...if your soil is damp, you don't even need to mix water with the quickcrete. It will still harden from the moisture in the dirt.
     
  7. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: It's possible to build a run without digging any post holes at all, as long as your spot is level
    You simply build the sides just as you would a wall and when you put them together it's self supporting. It helps to add bracing in the corners, and if it's large, some crossmembers on top
    .
    Building them this way gives you something solid to attach the fencing and aprons at the bottom too

    These 2 runs are each 12 X 18, and nothing goes below the ground:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2013
  8. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    Bear Foot Farm,

    Nice looking set up. It is hard to tell from the pics, but are those all 2x4's you used? And, how far did you space them?

    Jim
     
  9. muircheartaigh

    muircheartaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Bear foot farm,
    On our fenced pasture we usually go between 30 " - 36 " with the posthole digger. Those cedar posts last for decades. Interestingly every spring when my father and inspect the fence it's like a trip down memory lane. I plan on using rough sawn 4 x 4 posts at ten foot length and burying 24 " - 30" of the post with crushed rock and dirt backfill.
    In your photo are the studs 24 o.c. Or more? I may use this idea for part of my run that will enclose the exterior access nesting boxes.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Depth of posts holes would depend on your frost line, if you're trying to avoid frost heave...otherwise a couple of feet would work for stability.
     
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