Best Time To Order?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by artisan1, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. artisan1

    artisan1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Hi Chicken Lovers,

    I'm planning on ordering some pullets, and was wondering when the best time to order them would be in terms of moving them outdoors when they are the right age, but timed so that the weather is appropriate for this transition. I live in Milwaukee, WI.

    Thanks,

    Erik
     
  2. Buck Creek Chickens

    Buck Creek Chickens Have Incubator, Will Hatch

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    Nov 26, 2008
    Neenah, WI
    When you say pullets, are you getting chicks or ordering 18 week-old pullets?
     
  3. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Well we take the if-it's-there-it's-meant-to-be approach. In other words, if the feed store has chicks we want, we buy them and work it out. I have 3 week olds that will probably go outside at 8 weeks - their brooder outside is in a heated shed.... It all depends on what kind of a set-up you have.... Once they are fully feathered, they can keep themselves warm in most weather.

    PS - we are in CA, but we get freezing temps where I am...
     
  4. artisan1

    artisan1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    good question about the chicks or 18 week olds. What are the comparative advantages to each?

    Thanks!
     
  5. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    The difference is that 18 week old can go right outside. Chicks have to be kept in a warm environment until they are feathered. 18 week olds may not be as warm towards you having not know you, but chicks will LOVE you when they are older. We did both, because we wanted eggs right away, and I prefer buying and rising the chicks because I love that they like me and let me hold them and pet them as they get older.
     
  6. Buck Creek Chickens

    Buck Creek Chickens Have Incubator, Will Hatch

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    Nov 26, 2008
    Neenah, WI
    The other thing with chicks it might be easier to get the bread you want. The other thing you have to think about how many egg you want. Silkies don't fly as well, and tend to be home bodies. They winter well, are very friendly and lay a Med. seized egg. Heat also dosen't seam to bother them much. Finding older birds is easier.
     
  7. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    If you get chicks, consider that you'll want to keep them inside under heat lamps for a few weeks. If I remember correctly, you're the one wth the amazing roof garden, right?

    I don't know what winter winds are like there, but I never knew a Milwaukeean without Carmex (Karmex?) in their pocket, so I'm guessing the wind is substantial!

    I'm guessing if you got chicks the first week of March you could put them out by the end of the month. Is that about when it stops freezing hard there? People differ on this, but I find 4-5 week old chicks are fine in the cold. Its the really hard freezes that would make it miserable.

    Others?
     
  8. birdsofparadise

    birdsofparadise Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2008
    North Kohala, Hawaii
    The rule in Michigan used to be figure out the last frost free date for your area and then go back on the calendar 8 - 10 weeks. The date for me was usually May 15th, so I bought chicks around March 1st - March 15th. They were ready to be let out of the brooder just as the grasses started growing strongly. The same system should work wherever you are located. The "frost free" date for your area is available from the USDA or your County Agent.
     
  9. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    My Coop
  10. BayCityBabe

    BayCityBabe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 1, 2008
    Michigan, here. I took delivery on my chooks on May 14. It was still cold out. Kept them in the basement for 5 weeks. At about 5 weeks, DH and DS threatened to leave home due to the smell. [​IMG] However, it was nice enough outside to install them in their coop. We used a heat lamp in the coop for about 2 weeks. So, yeah, it was nearly July before I felt that my gang was hardy enough to stand our 50 degree nights.
    I must join those who recommend that you get chicks. They just bond with you. I have the ones I got as day-olds and some I acquired at 6-8 weeks. The latter group is just not as responsive or cuddly.
    So, I would recommend that you get chicks, but not too early, especially if you cannot keep them in the house or a heated garage for weeks. Good luck & happy planning.
     

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