Best way to incubate Black Copper Marans?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by MA Mama, Mar 9, 2012.

  1. MA Mama

    MA Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 21, 2012
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    I have heard that marans need a higher humidity due to the thinkness of the shell. But then I read that marans do better with dry incubation. Could I have your expereinces with hatching marans? Thanks in advance for your advice!
     
  2. nivtup

    nivtup Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 24, 2008
    Shelton Washington
    We hatched them at 45% humidity straight through and had great hatch rates.

    Your results may vary.
     
  3. cmfarm

    cmfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I always did mine the same way as any other egg and they hatched great. I tend to do lower humidity, like 30-40%
     
  4. MA Mama

    MA Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do both of you do that humidity the whole way through, or kick it up at the end? If so, what do you up it to at the end? I am feeling like books and such recommend too high of a humidity. I really appreciate your help!
     
  5. Chicken Keith

    Chicken Keith Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am so glad you asked this question. I got a dozen Marans eggs last year from a good breeder, very reputable. I got a 50% hatch rate. 5 of the dozen eggs did not seem to develop after about day 3-4, wondered if they were truly fertile. Chicks 6-11 hatched fine, I kept my humidity at 40-45%. Then, Chick #12... ...I thought I was being smart by upping the humidity to around 60%, because that's what the egg-sperts say, right? WRONGO, I'll never do that again! The Marans membrane was so rubbery elastic, that the chick tried with all it's might to break through. It pipped its shell all around just fine, but it never penetrated the membrane and drowned/suffocated inside its shell before it could hatch, and before I realized what went wrong. It was a little splash Marans chick. I was heart sick. learned a tough tough lesson...it's better to have lower humidity than higher, don't care what others might say on that.
     
  6. cmfarm

    cmfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At lockdown I usually do about 50% humidity.
     
  7. MA Mama

    MA Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is great information - thank you all so much.

    Chicken Keith: I think in my last hatch, where humidity was pretty high, I saw what you are talking about with the rubbery membrane. I thought that was "shrinkwrapping" and was due to too LOW humidity. Why would high humidity cause it to be rubbery? I am not questioning whether this is true or not, I am just wonder WHY that would cause it. It piped but then I helped it out (I know, shame on me). The membrane just UNDERNEATH the shell was papery, too, and I thought this was another sign of low humidity.

    I am so confused. However, I am definately going to lower humidity route this time!

    Thanks everyone!
     
  8. Chicken Keith

    Chicken Keith Chillin' With My Peeps

    No, you ask a very fair question. Common sense would seem to make the low humidity to cause a shrink wrapping effect. While I admit I'm no biologist, I presume the following occurred. I'm not so sure a shrink wrap effect did occur. The high humidity seemed to make the membrane too elastic. And, if it was too elastic (like rubber, for example) the chick couldn't tap its beak thru as easy as if the membrane had been more "brittle." Compare this to say, the difficulty of poking your finger through a rubber sheet (like a balloon) vs. poking your finger through dry toilet paper. If the humidity had been lower, I contend the membrane would have been penetrated easier due to the fact it was not as "waterlogged." I argue that a waterlogged membrane is more elastic than a not-so-waterlogged membrane.

    Now having said that, chicks can stick to the inside of their shell, if the humidity is too low, but to be honest, the humidity has to be like 10-20% for 8 or more hours for this to happen. The chick is pretty doggone wet from the fluids in the egg, and its body keeps alot of those fluids from escaping.

    Keeping the humidity between 40-60% is plenty adequate for a hatching chick days 18-21, my opinion. I only had troubles when I tried to raise the humidity to 80%--a foolish move on my part.
     
  9. Hauntedyards

    Hauntedyards Out Of The Brooder

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    I just hatched 10 out of 12 maran eggs and they were %35 for the whole incubation and then %60 for the hatch. They came out very quickly.
     
  10. chkinut

    chkinut Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 25, 2010
    Leesburg, Ohio
    i always up the humidity at lockdown to about 65%. but what i don't understand is......does the mother hen up her humidity at the end? i certainly wouldn't think so. any thoughts?
     

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