1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Best way to restrain a chicken?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by K R 2709, Dec 8, 2013.

  1. K R 2709

    K R 2709 Chillin' With My Peeps

    316
    7
    83
    May 21, 2013
    BC, Canada
    What is the best way to restrain a chicken? I need to find a good way to restrain them as I plan to cull some sick birds.
    Thanks,
     
  2. chews chooks

    chews chooks Out Of The Brooder

    95
    2
    41
    Oct 7, 2012
    northhampton
    if you hold there legs they go into a trance also if you lay them on there stomaches and draw a line infront of there beaks the same thing happens but the leg thing works way better[​IMG]
     
  3. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

    4,210
    451
    328
    Apr 8, 2008
    Ohio
    Restrain for killing? We think highly of a killing cone. Find an old traffic cone and cut the bottom out. Screw the cone onto a fence post or something similar with the point down. Stick the chicken down into the cone with their head sticking out, and slit the throat. They are very calm when held tightly upside down and do not panic or struggle.
     
  4. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

    5,427
    1,468
    351
    Mar 19, 2011
    NW Oregon
    I've used the CO2 method to kill sick birds I don't plan to eat and it worked quickly, easily with no need for restraint as the bucket does all the work for you.

    Get a 5 gallon bucket with lid. Purchase about half a pound to one pound of dry ice. Place dry ice in bucket and something to place on top of it to keep bird off ice (I made a platform from stryofoam). Pour about a cup of warm water to start fog then place bird in bucket and seal with lid allowing a small vent in lid for gas buld up. Wait. Bird will flutter madly for about 10 seconds in bucket and then will be still. They are dead with first gasp so fluttering is muscular convulsions after death.

    This method has worked well for me for sick birds that I'm not needing to bleed out to eat. For that we have used the cone method.

    Lady of McCamley
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2013
  5. K R 2709

    K R 2709 Chillin' With My Peeps

    316
    7
    83
    May 21, 2013
    BC, Canada
    Thanks for the info. They have crd/ mycoplasma do you think that they are safe to eat?
    Thanks,
     
  6. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

    5,427
    1,468
    351
    Mar 19, 2011
    NW Oregon
    While humans can't catch Mycoplasma Galliseptic (yet, it is an avian specific bacteria), and therefore you wouldn't catch that from the carcass, I prefer not to eat sick birds in general and in particular from diseases like this because a lowered immune system often promotes secondary infections such as E-coli overgrowth and Pasturella, which are harmful to humans. MG and IB are known for having secondary E-coli type overgrowths.

    I like the bloodless "killing bucket" for infectious disease as its all safe and tidy in the bucket and prevents any further possible transmission from blood letting since I would need to do that by the pasture trees where my birds are...my "killing bucket" is kept separate from my flock in my sick bird isolation area.

    Lady of McCamley
     
  7. K R 2709

    K R 2709 Chillin' With My Peeps

    316
    7
    83
    May 21, 2013
    BC, Canada
    Thanks
     
  8. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

    4,210
    451
    328
    Apr 8, 2008
    Ohio
    x2. I'd be uncomfortable eating sick birds for just these reasons. We also don't eat sick birds. Carcasses are wrapped in an old feed bag --we'll put the feed bag under the cone with the top rolled down a bit so it stands open and catches the blood. Then we put the whole thing in the trash. It's perfectly legal to do that, BTW--for some reason people think it isn't.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2013

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by