best way to transport roos to butcher?????

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by pouletdile, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. pouletdile

    pouletdile Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2010
    Taking my roos next week to the only place in Maine to have them butchered, which is 1.5hrs away from me, and I'm not sure exactly how to transport them. Someone suggested lobster crates (not traps). I really have no clue, would love suggestions.

    thanks.
     
  2. eKo_birdies

    eKo_birdies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    how many do you have to transport?

    i just use dog cages/crates... but i have 6 dogs so have lots lying around
     
  3. pouletdile

    pouletdile Out Of The Brooder

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    10-15. how many can you fit into a dog crate?
     
  4. eKo_birdies

    eKo_birdies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the big ones that are like 3x4 ft i would say 10 max... but this is all variable depending on how long you to have to transport them and the temperature the day you are transporting them.
     
  5. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    I think that chickens travel best in dim close quarters so they don't get jostled around as much. They won't need anything to eat during the trip, and as long as they've been given plenty to drink before crating them they shouldn't need water during the trip. You could fit 3-4 in a cardboard banana box, or some other carton. Put some straw on the bottom to absorb the poop & make sure there's sufficient air & ventilation.

    Find out from the butcher what happens when they get there, if they'll be processed right away or have to wait. If they have to wait, then find out if they have pens or cages for them. If not, then perhaps you can bring a larger cage/crate for them to use there, and have ways to give them water in it.

    [​IMG] However you get them there, enjoy the finished product when you get them home!
     
  6. Popsy

    Popsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use the big dog crates also. I usually put about 7 -8 in each crate, then cover them with a heavy blanket and tie it down in the back of my pickup. That way they stay warm if it is cool out and keeping it dark keeps them quiet. Of course if it is warm out, I wouldn't cover them.
     
  7. jaku

    jaku Chillin' With My Peeps

    I butcher birds for my buddy and I at my house, so he has to transport them to me- if you tape the legs and wings, they'll just lay there peacefully and you can just lay them down in the back of a truck. It works great.
     
  8. hensonly

    hensonly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This might be ok between friends, but my processer would not be happy at having to spend extra time un-taping the birds so they can be plucked and cleaned! I'd check with the processer first on this method. Though maybe to tape legs would be ok as they get cut off at some point anyway, and perhaps to tie wings??? ONly now I picture the tie coming loose and all those hobbled roos flapping around the inside of the van, falling over because they can't stand up...funny picture, but no good if it really happened!

    I also use dog crates.
     
  9. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can I ask, my processor wants them in a sealed container, I was assuming to keep any sick birds from infecting anyone else. Any clues on that one?
    I guess a cardboard box would do?
     
  10. ChIck3n

    ChIck3n Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't have any boxes/crates, I would guess you do have feed bags. I have seen people transport birds in a feed sack, just cut a hold big enough for their heads then stick the birds in. They won't move around, and the butcher should be able to pull them out relatively easily.
     

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