Big awkward White Leghorn

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Flycropper, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. Flycropper

    Flycropper Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2008
    Central Arkansas
    I am new to raising chicks. I have 12 chicks. One of them is a White Leghorn that is growing much faster and bigger than the others. At first I though that the chick had a skin dz because it’s skin was peeling off in some areas. After watching it for several days, I realized that it’s grown so fast that it’s has stretch marks. Compared to the chicks it’s same age this Leghorn is tall, wide and chubby…just a real porker. It walks across the coop a few feet and then lays down b/c it gets tired from hauling its weight. It’ll even lay in front of the feeder to eat. This week it finally learned how to fly up to the first rung of the roost (it’s brooder mates have mastered flying three rungs up 10 days ago). Even on the first rung it is the clumsiest of the group. It’s all it can do to keep from falling off and after many attempts to get comfortable but can’t b/c it will tip forward readjust then tip backwards flapping it’s wings the whole time to keep from falling. Finally, it will just give up and hop back down to the floor. It started showing the beginnings of a waddle/comb a week earlier than the other chicks. It’s a weird phenomenon to watch. I’m guessing this might be a rooster? It came out of the straight run bin at the store.
     
  2. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Sounds like a Cornish Cross meat bird got into the Leghorn bin. They can be described just like you said - "porkers".
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Yep, sounds like a classic cornish x meat bird. They were bred to reach the size of the birds you find in the store in 6-8 weeks. I personally think it is best that you do use it for food, as it is a cross breed and that is what 50 years of selective breeding has done to them. However, it is possible by some to keep them for a longer time. Many will end up dying if kept too long or not on a restricted diet.
     
  4. Flycropper

    Flycropper Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2008
    Central Arkansas
    Soooo...if it's a cornish cross meat bird...is it okay for it to eat feed the layers are going to get?

    And when should a meat bird full fill its destiny? At what age is a bird like this to be prepared for the table?
     
  5. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    He should be eating the chick starter along with the rest. He will be ready for the table at 8 weeks old.
     
  6. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 5, 2007
    Vermont
    Most cornish crosses are processed around 8 weeks old.

    Henry
     

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