Bird of Prey scares pigeons

Quacking Pigeon

Crowing
Mar 12, 2018
1,214
2,293
321
NSW, Australia
My Coop
My Coop
So I just said in my last forum that I was on that I haven’t lost many birds due to a bird of prey (1), but just as I went outside and took a seat a bird of prey comes over then all of my pigeons go flying. Basically in the end my others hang around the loft and 2 of them fly away (probs to the neighbors), I saw my brown male but I didn’t see the female (the pigeon that’s my profile pic both on YouTube and BYC). I’m just wondering if anyone else has experienced the same thing and actually had their birds return..
 

cavemanrich

Addict
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Apr 6, 2014
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Melrose Park Illinois
My first group/flock of homers did encounter a hawk chase, but were good enough fliers to out-fly the hawk. They returned after a number of hours.
My second batch/flock, of homers were @#$%^& mutts. :gig They were pretty, but not very smart. AKA lousy bloodline. Did get them low price BTW. Now I think I know why. :rant When a hawk would swish down on them sitting outside the loft, they scattered. I never did see a hawk grab one, but usually 2 would not return. They probably flew away and did not know way back. That was probably as a result of some previous owners breeding pigeons and mixing different types just to get white pigeons. I wanted white homing pigeons not white mixed mutts. :caf
@#$%^& = stupid or silly:gig
 

cavemanrich

Addict
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Apr 6, 2014
17,678
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Melrose Park Illinois
Most pigeons should return if just coop flown. It is the homers that will return from long distances.
Rollers and High flyers get trained to return to you with a portable loft/cage if you are away from home at a showing competition. If they were homers they would bolt straight home once you let them out of that portable cage.
 

LamarshFish

Crowing
6 Years
Mar 26, 2015
850
1,449
256
Unfortunately when birds of prey come around when the pigeons are out, a few bad things can happen--either the bird of prey catches and hurts or kills a bird, or sends the birds flying around to avoid the bird of prey. Untrained, young birds are at a high risk of being lost in this process if they were not trained to home well. Of course, non-homing breeds are at an even higher risk.

I found a hawk feather wedged inside the hardware cloth of my aviary this morning, so I know at least one is on to my loft. It's pretty much one of the biggest and most unavoidable issues most pigeon fanciers face.
 

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