Birds have mites, they're dusted, but now what? UPDATE: w/ QUESTIONS!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ThePolishPrincess, May 21, 2010.

  1. ThePolishPrincess

    ThePolishPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

    I bought a trio of Silkies from a breeder last Saturday and I found out yesterday that they had creepy-crawlies all over them. I have now identified them as red mites. We dusted with a 'livestock dust' that was useable for chickens with 'northern fowl mites'. Gave the birds a good dusting, on the crests, under wings, on back, vent, tummy, the works. I also changed their shavings and recleaned their brooder. They're about 3 months old.

    I looked them over this afternoon and they still have mites roaming around on them. How long does this stuff take to effectively work? When do I dust again to get rid of the second 'fleet'? Does dog tick and flee shampoo really work? Any advice or help appreciated.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  2. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    I would say dust again once a week untilt hey are gone.. If they arent dissapeearing by three weeks then you need to try something else.. I have used sevin dust and it worked great....
     
  3. MotherJean

    MotherJean Chillin' With My Peeps

    I also suggest Sevin dust for mites. However, if I was in your shoes, I'd be taking those birds right back to the breeder and have them put the time and expense into ridding them of mites. When they're healthy and parasite free, you can go pick them up again. If the breeder isn't willing to do that, get your money back and don't deal with them again.
     
  4. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Livestock dust - - does this contain permethrins or carbaryl?

    I have heard from very experienced poultry folk that it is very important to ROTATE pest treatments, as immunity of buggies to some of these ingredients is starting to pop up. Read your labels closely, and keep a dusting agent with each of these families of main ingredients on hand. If one is not working, rotate the other one in for the next year or so, then switch back.

    Hope that helps. In my yard we are finding pest resistance to permethrins/pyrethrins, so I have (unfortunately) had to rotate to carbaryl (Sevin dust), which I feel is not as safe, but . . . safer than losing hens to mites, eh?

    Good luck!
     
  5. laturcotte1

    laturcotte1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 22, 2010
    The birds love to dust themselves in dirt so I sprinkle sevin in the dirt piles and mix it around. When they dust they really dust! I also put some in the shavings they sleep on. Never had a sick chicken, not from mites or the sevin.
     
  6. detali

    detali Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 9, 2009
    What worries me is, does the pesticide treatment get into the chickens and negatively affect the eggs? There are so many environmental pollutants around that I hate the idea of adding it to my chickens since I'm really trying to get away from chemicals and additives of all kinds.
     
  7. detali

    detali Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 9, 2009
    What worries me is, does the pesticide treatment get into the chickens and negatively affect the eggs? There are so many environmental pollutants around that I hate the idea of adding it to my chickens since I'm really trying to get away from chemicals and additives of all kinds.
     
  8. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    I understand your concern; I too hate using chemicals, and only do so if I feel I must (i.e., I find actual evidence of pests on my birds or in my coops).

    I have found no research on pyrethrin or permethrin and eggs, and I do not believe there has been any done as yet. Most scientific research on chickens is geared toward mass production concerns, and this is the reason so many poultry folks have worked out their own dosages of medications or chemicals used for other livestock (which while it may work, is technically unapproved by the FDA). Worming meds are a good example of this.

    The research I have done seems to indicate that pyrethrin (synthesized extract of marigold) and permethrin both break down pretty quickly in the environment. I am not quite as sure about carbaryl. I prefer to use diatomaceous earth (freshwater, contains less silica) in dust bathing areas, in shavings, and even on brooding hens as a mite preventive.

    However, once you have a mite infestation, the priority really becomes getting rid of the pests ASAP. Mites can and do kill chickens. Silkies are notorious for mite issues simply because their fuzz is so thick.


    You may wish to do some online research of your own and find scientific/veterinary articles on some of the chemicals you have considered using. Locating the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) is also a good idea, and I try to read these for any chemical I am considering. The MSDS provides basic information on chemical compounds, and while they are not really geared toward consumers, I think they provide great basic info on what the chemicals do and the effect they can have on the environment.


    As always, I welcome corrections or comments on this info.
     
  9. Sjisty

    Sjisty Scribe of Brahmalot

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    May 18, 2009
    Brooksville
    I found mites on one of my chickens once. I put 4 drops of Eprinex on their necks. By the time I was finished with the last one, the first chicken had no signs of mites. I dusted their coops and changed the hay in their boxes and have never had a problem since. The Eprinex also kills worms. It has zero withdrawal time for eggs. We eat the eggs, and some of our chickens, with no problems.
     
  10. ThePolishPrincess

    ThePolishPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thank you everyone for your helpful replies. [​IMG] I'm going to continue with the treatment of this specific dust, because it is the one we have right now. It does seem to be working, at least on one of the males. My female still had a few in her, but she moves so much, it's difficult to tell whether they're alive or just dead, caught in her crest. I'm going to dust again in a week, though the directions on the label say nothing about repeat-dusting. If this doesn't work, I'll try Sevin, I'd have to order it because my TSC has nothing.

    I am honestly curious about bathing them in dog shampoo, though. Everyone suggests to use it when preparing birds for competitions, because it 'kills and bugs that may be in the feathers' and dog flea and tick shampoo is something something I CAN get my hands on.

    I'm afraid to sprinkle dust on the ground of their area because it says on the label that it's hardmful is breathed in, or swallowed by humans and animals. And they're always pecking on the ground/kicking their feed out and eating it off the ground. They're inside my basement; as far away from my main flock as can be. So now dirt is available to them. They're not laying eggs; they're only 3 months. But we tried using this stuff on our main flock and they were fine. (They didn't actually have mites on them, but we thought it was necessary, just in case.) I haven't had a chance to read the label to see what chemicals are contained in it, but I will check later.

    Jenski, thanks for much for that helpful info. Looks like I have my work cut out for me. [​IMG] But, for what it's worth, the birds in question seem very fine, active, and healthy, aside from the occasional scratch or itch, which has been happening less and less every day, I might add.
     

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