Birds not laying often enough.

Floridachicks3403

In the Brooder
May 2, 2019
12
19
26
I have four Rhode Island red hens.They were hatched May 1, 2019. It was extremely hot this summer in northern Florida. They didn’t begin to lay until late August. Now, I never get four eggs a day. Usually two sometimes three. I don’t understand why they are not lying. I use good feed they get treats, I don’t think they’re bored. I thought they would be better layers.
 

bpoore04

Chirping
Jun 14, 2019
50
56
71
With my experience, laying around 4 months old is a little early, considering mine start laying around 5-5 1/2 months. Also I have 8 hens that are laying right now and I never get 8 eggs a day. I don’t have any Rhode Island Red though so I can’t say for sure. I hope this helps a little
 

cmom

Hilltop Farm
12 Years
Nov 18, 2007
21,695
11,557
641
Florida
My Coop
My Coop
Mine have slacked off too. I think it may be from the change in weather. I give my birds good feed and treats. I was getting a dozen eggs from one of the coops and like someone turned off a light switch, not one egg for several days. Yesterday I did get one egg from that coop. I live near Ocala Florida. When pullets start laying they are sometimes sporadic and you will get some eggs then none and maybe an egg or two or none. They have to work out the kinks first. Come spring you will have all of the eggs you want. You are very lucky they started laying earlier than my RIR's have. If they are hatchery birds, hatchery birds usually do start laying sooner. I start hatching in February and my birds started laying in September. Good luck and have fun...
 

Peepsi

Songster
Apr 1, 2017
440
1,508
222
Utah
I have four Rhode Island red hens.They were hatched May 1, 2019. It was extremely hot this summer in northern Florida. They didn’t begin to lay until late August. Now, I never get four eggs a day. Usually two sometimes three. I don’t understand why they are not lying. I use good feed they get treats, I don’t think they’re bored. I thought they would be better layers.
Heat stress will make chickens lay less, and their eggs will often be thin-shelled.
Then, add to that the fact that the daylight hours are now shortening, and that triggers them to lay less, as winter approaches. Very few breeds of chickens lay just as well during during the winter as they do during the summer (warm or cold doesn't matter, it's the daylight hours), unless they are in an artificial environment where the lighting is controlled.

I wouldn't be too worried at this point. They'll be back and up and laying like gangbusters come February or March, when the daylight hours get longer.
 
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