Black Belgian D’Anvers Bantams Question

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ChickenGirl555, Feb 15, 2018.

  1. ChickenGirl555

    ChickenGirl555 Songster

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    In April i’m Going to get 2 polish chickens. But then, I went to the feed mill for more chicken feed, and these tiny little chickens were in the chick cages. Now, it’s pretty cold down here still, so when I asked them what they were the mill owner said, “They’re Black Belgian D’Anver Bantams.” Now this is my first year with chickens, and I only have large chicken breeds. So I said, “Are they for sale?” Because they were in the cages they would sell chicks in. The owner said “no they’re mine, but I’ll be breeding them in spring.” He had 1 rooster and 3-4 hens. When I first saw them I noticed their combs were too big and red to be chicks or recently feathered.

    So I am thinking about getting 3-4 of them. I won’t mix them with the large fowl, they would be crushed if I did. I am thinking about building a bigger coop to house my large chickens in, since I probably won’t stop at just 2 more polish. Then I would use the coop I have now for the Bantams. It would be like a mansion since I have 8 large chickens in it right now. It’s portable, has lots of roosts, and a nice window and ventilation.

    My question is, is there anything different about Bantams that I should know? Something special I have to do for this specific BREED? or is it like large chickens, but petite?

    ~Sorry for the long story, I thought it might help explain exactly what I’ll do with them, or at least let you understand what I’m asking better~
     
    Brahma Chicken5000 likes this.
  2. sylviethecochin

    sylviethecochin Free Ranging

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    Bantams don't lay nearly as often as the larger breeds do (they've been selected for cute, not use.) Many breeds of bantams are also more inclined to go broody, and I believe Belgians are noted for being good mothers. They may be slightly more prone to getting cold (less body mass) but my Old English Game Bantams last out the Northern PA winters just fine.
     
  3. ChickenGirl555

    ChickenGirl555 Songster

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    Yes I will most likely use them for show and their cuteness, but also the fact of small eggs makes me excited, even if we won’t get a lot. We might want them to raise chicks, since we won’t give away a rooster if we get one, so broodiness is not a bad thing. The cold hardiness was a big question I had, thanks for reminding me :), but I was wondering if putting a heating pad could help or what temperatures can they last in? The mill owner had them in the store because he didn’t want them to freeze in ‘the barn’. Is that just because it’s larger and more cold air can come in?
     
    sylviethecochin likes this.
  4. chuckachucka

    chuckachucka Crowing

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    I have a four month old lavender barbu d'Anver pullet and she seems to be a little skittish and quite vocal, but otherwise is the same as my other chickens except smaller. D'Aanvers are especially small bantams and are supposed to be good mothers. I've heard the cockerels can be a bit aggressive though, despite their size.
     
  5. chuckachucka

    chuckachucka Crowing

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    Also my d'Anver is living outside in an unheated coop through the winter without any problem. I don't know how extreme your winters get but here it hovers around 0°c mostly, especially at night, during the worst of the winter here.
     
  6. sylviethecochin

    sylviethecochin Free Ranging

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    D'uccles are supposed to be cold hardy. Unless you get down into the negative twenties, I wouldn't bother heating (I don't, and my OEGBs are fine, even in those temps. And they have large combs.)
     

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