Black Birchen Marans x Blue and Splash Ameraucana Results?

Jraba1315

Songster
Sep 11, 2019
180
381
126
Washington
Useful information! Correct me if I’m wrong but I think if you cross two bbs’ then the chicks will be bbs mutts so you speak. For example I’m thinking about crossing BBS Ameraucanas with BBS Orpingtons for “bbs EE’s”. Aka the blue coloring. Not positive if this works though but in your case I think you should have blue black and splash olive eggers like @Ridgerunner said with some possible leakage because of the birches heads that the mat and have. Update with the pictures of the chicks/chickens that come of it! I’m definitely curious
 
Oct 13, 2019
443
824
151
Longmont, CO
Useful information! Correct me if I’m wrong but I think if you cross two bbs’ then the chicks will be bbs mutts so you speak. For example I’m thinking about crossing BBS Ameraucanas with BBS Orpingtons for “bbs EE’s”. Aka the blue coloring. Not positive if this works though but in your case I think you should have blue black and splash olive eggers like @Ridgerunner said with some possible leakage because of the birches heads that the mat and have. Update with the pictures of the chicks/chickens that come of it! I’m definitely curious
Absolutely will do! It’ll be a fun experiment for me.
 
Oct 13, 2019
443
824
151
Longmont, CO
79EACC57-5341-421B-80F0-FD671BE15AD1.jpeg
The Blue and Splash are based on Black. Black is dominant over Birchen. So in theory you should get Blue and Black from the Blue hens and all Blue from the Splash.
Can I piggy bag on my original question?...So you say black is dominant over Birchen... is it dominant over most things? Like for example is I crossed this little guy (EE aka mutt) with a blue ameraucana or a black Marans for example, would it be predictable that the offspring would be mostly bbs or is that not how it works because we don’t know what genes he’s hiding? Thanks for bearing with me. Sorry if this is a dumb question. The color genetics are new to me.
 

mandelyn

Crowing
Aug 30, 2009
2,429
901
331
Mt Repose, OH
My Coop
My Coop
Using EE or other unknown hybrids adds a "surprise" variable to it and you will then start getting leakage. Adding a red or a gold will make the Splash look dirty, the Blues will get a mossy tone to them, the clear/crisp colors will be diluted and you won't have a bird that looks like it has "breeding" behind it.

Adding in Barring though, that gets fun!

Technically this guy is a "strategized mutt" but I like to call him a Barred Blue Silver Olive Egger. 3 different breeds in there.
oebarred3.jpg

Those barred girls behind him lay these...

oep19e.jpg


When you get into "dabbling" and hybridizing, you gotta take good notes and keep track of who was with who and who they made, in case you need to make it again or scrap it and avoid it in the future. Test hatches are important, as well as testing males for egg color by breeding them with a white layer and waiting all of that time for the daughters to lay.
 

Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
Feb 2, 2009
24,131
12,144
707
Southeast Louisiana
Can I piggy bag on my original question?...So you say black is dominant over Birchen... is it dominant over most things?

At one level yes but another level not so much. At one location on the DNA there are five known basic possibilities, Extended Black, Birchen, Wheaten, Duckwing, and Partridge. I consider this the basic canvas where you start. Extended Black is dominant over all of the others.

Then it gets complicated. There are all kinds of modifying genes out there. Some genes, like Dominant White or the B/B/S genes, modify only Black. Others can change a red feather to black so there are ways to get a solid black chicken from any of these. Some dominant genes, like Barring, will modify any feather though you can't see barring on a truly white feather. Some Recessives can hide under whatever is there unless it pairs up. On and on and on. So, yes, Black is generally dominant but you never know what will actually happen when you breed chickens unless you are pretty sure of what genetics you are starting with. Then they do follow rules. But you can't always tell by looking.

Like for example is I crossed this little guy (EE aka mutt) with a blue ameraucana or a black Marans for example, would it be predictable that the offspring would be mostly bbs or is that not how it works because we don’t know what genes he’s hiding?

If you make those crosses I would expect the offspring to be basically Black or Blue, but I would expect a fair amount of leakage. You could get some real surprises too. You don't know for sure what the Black or Blue ens may be hiding.

Madelyn talked about leakage. I'll give a couple of examples. In theory this should be a solid black bird. But some gold leaked through.

Leakage Black  Roo.JPG


In theory these white cockerels should be solid white but you can see different stuff showing through. It can vary quite a bit.
Leakage.JPG
 
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