Black/Narragansett hen laying eggs for over a month but won’t set?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by cndncntrygirl, May 30, 2019.

  1. cndncntrygirl

    cndncntrygirl Hatching

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    May 28, 2019
    hey y’all,
    I have an almost 3 yr old Black/Narragansett hen who laid eggs in Dec and now from April to May. My flock free range/pasture and At first she was laying eggs in an enclosed dog kennel in our barn but then made a hidden nest under the cover of juniper bushes and it was well hidden. It was still very cold in April so once I found her nesting area I collected her eggs to incubate some. She’s been laying for a month now and I made her a new nest similar to the surroundings of where her original nest was. I made the nest in the barn out of dry leaves and juniper branches I cut off. I kept her closed in the barn and barnyard for a few days so she would start using her new nest and she’s laid 3 eggs so far. If I leave all her eggs in her nest will she set on them after she’s laid a sufficient amount? She’s hatched he’d own eggs last August but nothing since? Hoping someone else may have some experience in broodiness with a black hen? She’s still laying eggs after 30days!
    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    Feb 24, 2013
    Natrona County, Wyoming
    Each turkey has its own idiosyncrasies. If she has gone broody in the past, she will likely go broody again. The only one that knows when she will go broody is her. Usually the later it is in the season, the fewer eggs laid that it takes to cause broodiness.

    If the father of your hen was the Black turkey and the mother was the Narragansett, she would be a Barred Black and would have no Narragansett because Narragansett hens cannot pass their Narragansett genes on to their female offspring.

    If the father was the Narragansett and the mother was the Black, she would be a Light-tipped Barred Black. Of course this also depends on whether or not the parents were carrying any hidden recessive genes.
     

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