Black Rosecomb

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by angels4, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. angels4

    angels4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've just been introduced to these beautiful birds while researching what breeds I will be getting this spring. Does anybody have any experience with them? I've never thought of getting Bantams, but have falling madly and deeply in love with this breed.

    I have read that they tolerate heat and cold well, but special care is needed as chicks as they mature slowly, and that their combs are more vunerable. How do you think they might fare here in the frigid Northeast of New England? Am I biting off more than I can chew or what special accomadations can I make for them during the winter months. Thanking you all in advance.
     
  2. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

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    May 8, 2008
    Sharpsburg, MD.
    I don't give mine any "special" treatment. Top show breeders like Rick Hare live in the N.E. and they do fine. Their combs and lobes are sensitive and will buise if they get snagged on something or they get into a scuffle with another roo.

    Im looking for some more. My blue hen disappeared after I re-homed her main man. Im hoping she's sittin on some eggs somewhere but Im not counting my chickens....

    The thing is very few people breed them on here...and the ones that do are pretty far away. Urban Coyote has some gorgeous ones but she's in Canada.

    Try Rosecomb.com/federation/members

    for folks in your area that raise them.
     
  3. angels4

    angels4 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks Msbear.....I will definatley do that. Also, how about keeping them in the same run with heavier breeds, are they safe or picked on because of their smaller size or docile nature?
     
  4. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

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    May 8, 2008
    Sharpsburg, MD.
    A heavier roo may hurt a rosecomb hen and definitely may pick on a rosecomb roo...but if they were in with hens.... should be fine.

    or if you have enough land for them to range separately, that would work too.
     

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