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Black Scab Fell Off

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ClareScifi, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am a bit worried about the black scab that seemed to fall off my rooster's comb (just one side of his comb) today.

    I had noticed blood on his hackles this afternoon, just a little, not too much, but was wondering where it could have come from.

    Then I noticed his comb appeared a bit bloody. I touched the blackish scab on it, which I had not seen before.

    Later I noticed it had come off and his comb was raw and bloody where it had been. Not too bad, but noticeable.

    What do you think would cause a black scab like that, other than an injury? He does have some black scratch marks on his comb that I am sure are from snagging on something, maybe rosebushes.

    There seems to be an equivalent black scab on the other side of his comb that hasn't fallen off yet.

    He seems energetic and happy and has a good appetite.

    You don't think it could be fowl pox, do you? I'm in Salt Lake City, and I don't think there is much fowl pox here.

    He did sleep indoors last night, and I'm wondering whether he could have cut his comb on a drapery hook in the solarium, where he slept.

    Funny I didn't see any sign of it when I carried him outside at noon today.

    I hope he doesn't get frostbite in the bloody area tonight. It is supposed to get down to anywhere from 28 degrees F to 34 degrees F, depending on which forecast is right. I tend to think it will probably be down to 31 degrees F. This will be the coldest night he has slept outside so far, in the coop, with a white leghorn pullet on each side of him. I am hoping they will keep him nice and warm. He's happier with the hens in the coop than alone in the solarium, I feel.
     
  2. chickensbythesea

    chickensbythesea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you sure there's no chance of injury... Not even a nip from a hen?
    Sounds like a pretty normal comb injury to me, if it isn't, can you try and get a picture?

    I know you posted it last night, but when in doubt with boys and cold, vaseline their combs and wattles. In this case, I'd neosporin the actual wound, vaseline the rest.
     
  3. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, Chickens by the Sea.

    Well, I brought him in the house last night. The temperature dipped to 27 degrees F outside this morning. He seems okay this morning, but he's not crowing like he normally does.

    Then I went to let out the hens. Usually I let them out about 7:30 a.m., but because it's colder this morning it was 9 a.m.

    I was horrified to see one of my white hens with blood on her comb! This is a first.

    Do you suppose someone has started pecking the others, and why would this be?

    My best bet would be the Mama Hen who is older. I have seen her acting more nervous than usual, running around and pseudo pecking at the girls from time to time, when they get near her food. She seems to get annoyed more easily than in the past. What could cause this, I wonder?

    I thought things were going so well, and now I have two comb injuries to deal with.

    Do I have to keep the white leghorn that was pecked separated from the others so they won't peck more? And if so, for how long? I guess I need to buy some Blue Kote?

    Is it possible it could be parasites, lice, or something sharp that is scratching their combs. I wonder whether there could be something by their roosting perch. I saw one hen sleeping up their last night, but I'm not sure it's the injured one.

    Oh, dear. I wasn't expecting this.
     
  4. chickensbythesea

    chickensbythesea Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It could be a head pecker from the sounds of it, I'd guess that before I guessed a predator, especially since neither sounds like a substantially grave wound.

    What's changed in the flock recently? Have they increased egg production a lot, or have you added new birds for instance? If she's feeling insecure about her position in the pecking order, she's going to peck until she's confident she's the boss, or very clear on the fact she isn't. If you can catch the culprit in the act, the best thing to do is isolate the troublemaker for a few days, it will humble her some.
    Also, even if it's cold, give them as much freedom as long as you can, if they're trapped in a coop, it's harder to escape a bully.

    It's just the comb, right?
    I wouldn't worry about blukote unless the wounds look raw, as long as it isn't shiny red it's not terribly tempting (black and scabby? mehhhh). Again, once she gets a scab, I wouldn't worry about keeping anyone but the troublemaker separated. If there's a lot of head trauma, I'd isolate and/or blu-kote.
     
  5. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, ChickensBytheSea!

    This afternoon all is well.

    I worried about the pullet when she drank this morning because she was dripping blood off the comb. But I let her free-range, and it all dried up, and no one has pecked at her, and everyone is peacefully co-existing.

    I let the rooster out a little after noon, and same story. No one is bothering his comb.

    Very weird. I think it must have been a freak accident? I am so glad there is no fighting going on.
     
  6. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    P.S. I think I'll make sure the rooster sleeps with the girls tonight. If they are cat-fighting, he can help keep order. And I'll keep the coop door open, as you suggest, so they can go outside as soon as they want at dawn's light (into the run, I mean), to help eliminate stir-craziness over space issues. Hopefully, that will help, if it is fighting of some kind.
     

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