bleeding comb on rooster

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rockmaster, Dec 14, 2010.

  1. rockmaster

    rockmaster Out Of The Brooder

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    May 18, 2010
    I'ts severe weather in my area. 10 degrees with blowing winds. My husband and I did our very best to insulate our large chicken barn. The hen'spicking on the rooster's comb. I tried everything, including rubbing clove spice on it!!!!. I have 60 hen's in the 10 by 20 barn
    they're supposed to hate the smell, however it's not working. I have a large coal cellar pretty warm inside. I felt so bad for my rooster that I decided to place him in their. Created a roost and all the goodies to go. I couldn't put him in the garage because of sharp objects and no other chickens to cuddle with for warmth. Now that I explained all the details my question is, How long can I keep my rooster in the warm coal cellar.
    Will the rooster start to molt in a few days ? also how difficult will it be for the rooster to adjust back to the cold weather? I have no place in the coop for seperation. My chickens are free ranged and have at least 2 acres to roam. Because of this extreme conditions they do not want outside and I will not allow it until it warm's up . thanks rockmasters momma
     
  2. chicks4kids

    chicks4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Northern Indiana
    Is it only 1 hen picking on him or several? Is it possible to isolate the hens rather than the roo in the coop? I would think that you wouldn't want to keep in the coal room too long considering the adjustment he'll have to make when he's put back out in the barn. You could always put some Blu-Kote on the roos comb to keep the hens from being drawn to it. It's a blue antiseptic you can find at like TSC or hardware stores that have an animal department in a yellow spray bottle. It will stain your fingers so be careful, but it'll make any injury less obvious and less likely to be picked at.
     
  3. wildorchid053

    wildorchid053 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    syracuse area, ny
    i have the same thing happening.. i was talking to a member here and we both think that once they have tasted him they will keep picking at the comb.. her roo was so beaten up she had to put him down.. we healed ours and put him back out and a few days later i went to ck on them. evening for food and water and he was on roost with his head bowed down and a few out of 20 hens were licking his blood that was dripping of his comb.. i think once they taste him he won't be able to go back.. this is the second time for him.. he is downstairs in the warmth healing again.. i am not sure what we will do with him.. he is very gentle and good with the girls .. they just like him a little TOO MUCH. good luck with yours.. we don't cull so he will probably be in his own coop inside the large coop..
     
  4. LivinNewDreamInND

    LivinNewDreamInND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 22, 2010
    Try coating his comb thick with bag balm and put him back on the roost on the next warmer night. I do that when any of my chickens are getting pecked and not only does it heal the wound but it also must taste or feel nasty because I have never seen one that has been treated get pecked again.
    I am not sure about the molting in a couple of days or how long he will need to acclimate to the colder weather though.
     
  5. chicks4kids

    chicks4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Northern Indiana
    You know, LivinNewDreamInND has a good idea with the bag balm too. Especially if you don't have the Blu-Kote!! Bag balm is amazing!! True...twins and no stretch marks all due to Bag Balm...(yes, I used it) [​IMG] Excellent idea LivinNewDreamInND!
     
  6. rockmaster

    rockmaster Out Of The Brooder

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    May 18, 2010
    what is bag balm,? I have blu coat and used this product on another rooster years ago same situation however the hens continued to pick this poor fellow and I had to have it culled. I have thick petrolium jelly , utter cream , I have to look in my medicine cabinet for something extremely thick. It's a shame because the first roo I had to cull was a buff orpington and this new one is a barred rock both have the same combs and wattles which they will attack also. This weather is not condusive to these types of roosters. I was lucky last year with this new guy. I have found out over the past 7 years raising all types of chickens, that free ranging in a pasture eliminates a great deal of disease's and cooking rice in the winter months helps them greatly because of the carbs. One piece of advice for anyone who encloses these darlings in a coop during winter months, beware of hay inside the coop. The chickens are seeking grass and if there is none to eat, they will eat the hay and become impacted!!!!! once this happens you have a gonner . In the beginning I found this out and I even tried using a latex glove with jelly and inserted my finger to try to pull some of the hardend bowl out. It helped one of my hens but the other I couldn't save. Also add pure apple cider vinager to their water all through the year, This helps their digestive system and sustains their ph balance helps ward off virus's. Place 2 cap fulls into a gallon of water and you will be surprised when you see the chickens drink it, They love it . I use pine shavings and I clean them accordingly. thanks again for all the great info..Rockmasters momma
     
  7. LivinNewDreamInND

    LivinNewDreamInND Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 22, 2010
    Bag balm is just a vitamin enriched petroleum jelly type product. I have never seen utter cream but I imagine it is the same thing. I buy mine at tractor supply but I have also seen it in walmart's pet department. It is great stuff! I use it for scrapes on my dogs or if their pads are dry and I also used it for both of my kids diaper rash.

    Apparently I should have talked to chicks4kids 5 yrs ago, because I would have bought a whole case if it meant no stretch marks, lol.
     

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