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Bleeding Comb

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by EMarston, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. EMarston

    EMarston In the Brooder

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    Jun 22, 2010
    I have a pullet with a reasonable amount of blood along the side/bottom of her small comb and I can't seem to find the answers I need in the FAQ's or through a quick search of the archives (the posts there all mention products I don't have on hand!)

    1. The blood seems to be congealed so I'm not sure if I should clean it because I'm afraid the bleeding may start again?

    2. If I am to clean it, is there something that I have at home that I could use? Dr. Bronner's? Hydrogen Peroxide? Plain water?

    3. What should I put on it, if anything? Preferably something that I have on hand??

    4. Do I have to keep her isolated (as she is now)? Or once I put something on it can I let her back out w/ the others?

    Thanks!!!!

    Erica in MN
     
  2. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    Hey [​IMG]
    Sorry About your hen. I would Load her wound up with flour. And even though she will look awful, i wouldnt try to clean her up for a few days, as her scap will be extremely fragile. As far as separating her, thats your call, if you see her beaing picked on then i would, but if she is being left alone bye her flockmates then she should be okay.
    I Hope I helped
    Mark
     
  3. EMarston

    EMarston In the Brooder

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    Jun 22, 2010
    Wow, I never would have thought of flour--thanks!!! :)

    Erica in MN
     
  4. Sweetfolly

    Sweetfolly Songster

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    Kildare, Wisconsin
    Okay, first of all - flour will work in a pinch, but it's best to have a Styptic powder on hand (I like Kwik-Stop), you can get a BIG container of "Blood Stop Powder" at any farm store for less than $5, and it lasts practically forever. That's going to help protect the wound better, as it generally has some sort of antibiotic or antiseptic agent in it - flour leaves the wound wide open to infections, especially fungal infections. I don't like to take any chances with wounds on the head. You would NOT want to pack it with flour and then LEAVE it for a few days. [​IMG]

    Once the bleeding is under control, if you want to put her back with the other chickens, I'd recommend putting a dab of Blue-Kote over the wound - not only will the blue color help discourage the other chickens from pecking at it, Blue-Kote is a great broad-spectrum anti-biotic and anti-fungal ointment (and again, you can get a bottle of it at any farm store for about $5, it lasts practically forever, and I use it ALL the time on the birds AND on the dogs). It's nasty stuff though - watery, and it'll stain your hands like ink (one of the active ingredients is gentian violet!), so wear gloves. [​IMG] You can gently clean the area up with plain water first, and hydrogen peroxide works on superficial wounds - it can actually damage more delicate tissue though, so you wouldn't want to use it too much on a deeper wound.

    I have 3 years of veterinary assistant experience, in addition to dealing with lots of wounds on my own animals. I've never lost an adult bird to anything other than old age. Your problem sounds very small - styptic powder, clean it up with water, a dab of Blue-Kote, and you should be good to go. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2010
  5. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    Ive Used Flour Many Times without any problems [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. Sweetfolly

    Sweetfolly Songster

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    Quote:Oh, there's no question that, in the vast majority of cases, a sloppy job like that will work. But when it comes to an animal's health, it's just good stewardship to set the bar a little higher and take the time to be thorough. Domesticated animals depend on us to keep them healthy, so we should all put in the effort to learn the basics. [​IMG]

    Kudos to you, EMarston, for being worried enough to come here and ask advice! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2010
  7. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

    4,348
    21
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    Aug 11, 2009
    Taunton, MA
    Quote:Oh, there's no question that, in the vast majority of cases, a sloppy job like that will work. But when it comes to an animal's health, it's just good stewardship to set the bar a little higher and take the time to be thorough. Domesticated animals depend on us to keep them healthy, so we should all put in the effort to learn the basics. [​IMG]

    Kudos to you, EMarston, for being worried enough to come here and ask advice! [​IMG]

    Sloppy Job. Okay Hahaha [​IMG]
     

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