Bleeding from inside beak!!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by M EGG, Nov 18, 2016.

  1. M EGG

    M EGG Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2016
    NJ
    Vet diagnosed mild prolapse yesterday & gave metacam & amoxicillin. Fecal negative. For 3 days she has froth on sides of her beak, today subsided then an hour ago blood & some bloody froth. She ate crumbles, grit & water today, no regurgitation seen. Poop normal, then few hours ago one smelled like rotten meat, then others ok after. Crop was softer. Rattles beak like saliva/froth coming up? Noticed her eating some pine shavings a while ago so we took her out of that area. She's trying to sleep now & a bit of raspiness to her breathing, takes a few shallower breaths then a bigger one. Respiratory/heart/crop??? Foreign body/infectious disease?
     
  2. M EGG

    M EGG Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2016
    NJ
    She's 8 mos old & we've had her since 3 weeks. For months now she would sneeze a bit & open beak breathe. When eating she'll eat so fast that it sounds like she sneezes(don't know if it's a cough) like food possibly getting stuck on its way down??
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Look inside her beak for anything that could have been cut or injured. Bloody mucus in a bird showing signs of a respiratory disease is a sign of a virus called ILT or infectious larygotracheitis. They will typicially gasp, extend their necks, cough, and may sling bloody mucus around the coop. Here is a good link from The Poultry Site and blow that is an excerpt from The Merck Veterinary Manual:
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/83/infectious-laryngotracheitis-ilt/

    ILT in Chickens
    The Merck Veterinary Manual

    [​IMG]
    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute, highly contagious, herpesvirus infection of chickens and pheasants characterized by severe dyspnea, coughing, and rales. It can also be a subacute disease with nasal and ocular discharge, tracheitis, conjunctivitis, and mild rales. The disease is caused by Gallid herpesvirus I, commonly known as infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). It has been reported from most areas of the USA in which poultry are intensively reared, as well as from many other countries.
    Clinical Findings

    In the acute form, gasping, coughing, rattling, and extension of the neck during inspiration are seen 5–12 days after natural exposure. Reduced productivity is a varying factor in laying flocks. Affected birds are anorectic and inactive. The mouth and beak may be bloodstained from the tracheal exudate. Mortality varies but may reach 50% in adults and is usually due to occlusion of the trachea by hemorrhage or exudate. Signs usually subside after ~2 wk, although some birds may show signs for longer periods. Strains of low virulence produce little or no mortality with mild respiratory signs and a slight decrease in egg production.
    After recovery, birds remain carriers for life and become a source of infection for susceptible birds. The latent virus can be reactivated under stressful conditions. Infection also may be spread mechanically. Several epidemics have been traced to the transport of birds in contaminated crates, and the practice of litter spread in pastures is believed to be related to epidemics of the disease.
     
  4. M EGG

    M EGG Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2016
    NJ
    Thank you, Eggcessive. We went back to the vet yesterday & I did ask about ILT after coming across it too & upon exam the inside of beak, trachea, etc all looked ok & not irritated. In talking with the vet I mentioned about 3 hrs prior to her bleeding our 19 lb rooster jumped on her, she's 14 lbs,(we supervise when they free range but he got to her before us this time) perhaps this was a possible injury to her air sac & caused the bleeding through the night & by am it had stopped. I'm thinking since she hadn't laid an egg in 3wks due to the cooler temps, then we increased the artificial light and then she laid one in the afternoon on nov 15th & 2-3 hours later the foam/froth/saliva was on sides of her beak. If she has a mild prolapse perhaps this is a pain response? or since she has a protrusion under her cloaca that vet thinks is possibly the colon, then maybe there is pain/pressure from her organs being shifted & pushed further up or down in her body. Perhaps there is pressure on her digestive or respiratory tracts? No foam seen on beak since yesterday am except for a little bit after she was scratching& pecking through pine shavings today. Wonder if an allergic response?
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I'm not a vet, so don't have a lot of answers. Bleeding sometimes can occur in hens with fatty liver syndrome. Those hens may be overweight, have decresed laying, have a lot of internal fat, and the liver may be enlarged or be putty colored. They can have hemorrhages. Hopefully, you can figure it out. Could she have swallowed rat poison or eaten a mouse that had been poisoned?
     

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