Blood on one poop

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by merlotmudpies, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. merlotmudpies

    merlotmudpies Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi guys -- I have four hens. Today I was cleaning up poop from the coop (I do daily) and saw a bit of blood and mucus on one stool. My hens are new to me -- 2 weeks. All are under two years old. I've been picking up their poop regularly. They are all acting fine, and all are eating and running to me for treats -- mainly a few meal worms and sunflower seeds with their lay pellets. Is this ever normal? I inspected all other poops and found no other blood.
     
  2. merlotmudpies

    merlotmudpies Out Of The Brooder

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    Anyone? Sorry. Don't want to ignore something serious. But don't want to overreact to anything normal.
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Might be a good idea to worm them with Safeguard or Valbazen.

    -Kathy
     
  4. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Could be normal intestinal lining you are seeing,but since your chickens are new to your area i would look up information for coccidiosis. Cocci is a parasitic infection of the intestinal tract. Some symptoms of cocci are : runny/watery poop(may or may not contain blood,depends on which of the 9-11 strains it is)fluffed feathers,lethargic,not eating/drinking normal,weight loss. If symptoms match,purchase Corid(amprolium)dose for corid 9.6% liquid is 2 tsp per gallon of water,dose for Corid 20% powder is 1 tsp per gallon of water.Treat ALL chickens for 5-7 days,make sure medicated water is the only water they have to drink. Do not give vitamins during treatment(interferes with the ability of the coccidiostat to work)give vitamins after treatment is complete.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Corid or Amprol (amprolium) is always a good thing to have in the first aid kit.

    Here is some of what I know about the amount of medicine in Corid and Amprol

    1/2 teaspoon of 20% powder = 2.8125ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 270mg of amprolium.
    3/4 teaspoon of 20% powder = 4.21875ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 405mg of amprolium.
    1 teaspoon of 20% powder = 5.625ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 540mg of amprolium.
    1.5 teaspoons of 20% powder =8.4375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 810mg of amprolium.
    1.75 teaspoons of 20% powder = 9.84375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 945mg of amprolium.
    2 teaspoons of 20% powder = 11.25ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 1080mg of amprolium.​

    FDA recommendations:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
    "Chickens
    Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
    Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."


    And this link has these instructions:
    http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
    "Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."

    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons (4.536 grams).
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.

    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon (2.268 grams).
    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.

    The .006% for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon (1.134grams).
    The .006% for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.​

    More Corid and Amprol info here:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Since they are new to your soil, they may be exposed to a new strain (there are 9) of coccidia that they haven't built up immunity to yet. You could do a half strength preventative treatment of Corid (amprollium,) or you could wait and see if they start to look sick, and treat with full strength. Full dosage is 1 to 1 1/2 tsp powder Corid ( or 2 tsp liquid Corid) in 1 gallon of water. There is only blood in some coccidiosis, but signs are lethargy, poor appetite, diarrhea, "puffing up," and ruffled feathers.

    Sorry but it took me 50 minutes to post this when I was interrupted. Glad others responded.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
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  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    No offense intended to anyone, really, but per the mfg of Corid and Amprol, the .24% powder dose is 4.536 grams, which is *no* less than 1.5 teaspoons.

    -Kathy
     
  8. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No offense taken,i just post per my vets instructions.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree it is highly likely a case of Coccidiosis. You don’t always get bleeding and usually they are lethargic and acting sick by the time it gets to the bleeding stage, but this sound right for Cocci. You move chickens to a new area, there is a strain of Cocci they haven’t built up an immunity to, and it normally takes a while for the numbers in their guts to build up to a harmful level. Wet soil can make this worse too.

    It’s not unusual or harmful for chicken to have some Cocci in their system. They normally build up and immunity to that specific strain. It’s when the numbers get out of control in their guts that the damage is done. Wet soil contributes to the life cycle of the Protozoa that causes Cocci. That’s why wet can make it worse.

    Just another thought though. Have you fed them any treats that might color their insides red? When I can beets they get the cooked peelings. The next day it looks like they are pooping blood all over the place.
     
  10. merlotmudpies

    merlotmudpies Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 11, 2013
    Southern CA
    Guys what amazing community of helpful peoe you all are. Thank you! Re new soil, the girls are new to me but from the same area -- within four miles. This morning I checked all their poop as I cleaned and saw no more red at all. As to treats, they did have black seedless grapes and gobbled them so perhaps that was something I saw. Will keep this info and go check in at my local feed store today. Thanks so much to all of you.
     

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