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  1. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    I went out and seen my chicken had dried blood on her comb and at first I didn't even think it was blood the way it was crusted on there.. I took warm water and tried getting it off but couldn't.. Any ideas on what to do? I sprayed blukote on it so the other chickens wouldn't peck and I imagine that's what it's from?

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  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Bluekote stains a blue-purple color attracting chickens to the area. I wouldn't recommend it, especially close to any mucous membranes. That blood will dry and flake off. In the morning, observe the birds when you let them out to eat first thing. Observe them periodically throughout the day if you need to. See if you can identify the offender, and you may have to separate the offending bird from the flock for a few days, then try reintroducing it back to the flock, or even trim the tip of the upper beak if necessary. So long as there are no injures to the eyes, or open wounds to attract further picking, it should heal fine.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  3. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    My rooster mounts all the chickens do you think it could possibly be from that? And I imagined when he jumps on them he's fertilizing them and is this okay?
     
  4. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Yes, it is normal so long as your rooster isn't abusive or pecking hens when mounted. From the location of the blood, it could have been from bickering at the feed troughs with other hens. I make sure I have more than one feeding location so the more docile hens don't get harassed by the more aggressive hens. Observe your rooster's mating habits. They generally hold the hen's comb or neck feathers while mounting. Some feather loss is normal, but not injuries.
     
  5. Free Feather

    Free Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

    You should separate her, and if you know who the culprit was, separate that one as well. Have the injured on where everyone can see her, but not the culprit. This way they will likely accept her easier since they could still see her. Since they could not see the bully, he/she will be at the bottom of the pecking order. Unless the bully tries to make up for lost time bullying.
     

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