bloody diarrhea

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by nuts4chickens, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. nuts4chickens

    nuts4chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 23 bantam chicks that are 5 weeks old and today I noticed some very bloody diarrhea from a few of them. All of them are active and eating,drinking, etc... except for two. I have two that are "puffed up" and look cold, and are less interested in "chicken-like" activities... still eating and drinking. We recently started taking them out to the big coop (their own, no other birds) the last few days during the day to help them acclimate to the climate. Temps here have been 65-75 degrees. They all huddle in the corner when we bring them back in... even with the heat lamp. They have not been on medicated feed. I just started them on Sulmet tonight. It is the only thing I have on hand tonight. I have a few questions. 1. Does this sound like Cocci? 2. Did we move them out too soon, and should we bring them back inside during the day as well? 3. Do I need to do anything else for my droopy ones 4. How fast does the Sulmet work and any othr suggestions?
     
  2. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It definitely sounds like cocci to me.

    I've never raised bantams or used Sulmet (i used Corid), so i can't comment on the rest.

    Whatever you treat them with, be sure you're treating the whole flock.
     
  3. rstampa

    rstampa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At 5 weeks they should be fine outside. And 70-75 degrees is the perfect temperature for chickens. They are definitely sick. I don't know the systems some of the chicken diseases but bloody diarrhea is not good.
    What are you feeding them? Do you feed them any types of treats?
    They may even have warms. Check their poop and see if you see anything wiggling in it.
    I started my girls out with Medicated starter feed against Coccidia for the first 3 weeks. And they were also vaccinated for Marek's disease.

    Here is a article from Common Diseases of Poultry.

    And the link if you like to know more.

    http://www.petalia.com.au/Templates/StoryTemplate_Process.cfm?Story_No=1727#ct-6

    "Internal parasites
    Backyard poultry also carry a wide range of internal parasites. These range from large roundworms (Ascarids) that are visible with the naked eye; to small, single celled organisms only visible under a microscope (Coccidia, Trichina's, and Giardia). Internal parasites attack the lining of the intestine, and absorb nutrients from the gut that the bird should be using for maintenance of its own body and production of eggs. Worms (and other internal parasites) are spread from bird to bird by the ingestion of eggs from the feces of infected birds. Regular removal and cleaning of farces from the bird's enclosure will result in less worm eggs in the environment, and less chance of worms spreading from bird to bird.

    Signs of internal parasitism may include weight loss, pale combs or diarrhea.

    Your local veterinarian will be able to look at feces under the microscope, and advise you which type of worms and protozoan parasites are present by the type and number of eggs they observe in the fecal sample.

    Some types of worms, such as Capillaria, are more difficult to treat than others. Your veterinarian will be able to advise you of a suitable treatment that is specific for the parasites they observe. It is important that withholding periods for treatments are observed. This requires that eggs and meat from birds treated with certain drugs be discarded for a period of time after the drug has been used. This prevents humans ingesting the drugs the chickens were treated with via the eggs or meat. Make sure you check the exact withholding period with your veterinarian, or on the label of the product."
     
  4. spotsplus

    spotsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Definatly sounds like Cocci. Especially if you were not feeding medicated feed. Use Sulmet for the full 10 days. Even if only some show signs they will all probably get it as it's very common, it's everywhere in the soil and contageous. At 5 weeks they could be getting chilled. I just bring mine in early rather than leaving them out for the day if they are getting chilly. It usually takes them fifteen minutes to half hour to "warm up" and usually they take a nap when they come in. In two weeks all the signs should have passed and once they get Cocci they are immune to it after. Just keep them warm. If any look like they dont' feel well or you can identify those with runny poop I'd keep them in and keep them warm. If they really don't feel well they will stop eating so I'd keep an eye on that. They can beat it but it will be a bit messy till they get over it. Good luck!
    T
     
  5. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    Puffied up and bloody poo is Cocci. They need treatment fast. The ones showing those symptoms don't have long.

    Sulmet is the fastest treatment. Corrid works but takes a little longer. I use Sulmet and have never lost a chick to sulmet. Even 1 that was almost gone made it.

    This disease will delay their development at least 2-4 weeks.

    Matt
     
  6. nuts4chickens

    nuts4chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you say Sulmet will delay their developement... you mean they will behind 2-4 weeks as far as growth?

    We have just started putting them out this week. Before then, they have been in the brooder in the garage. They have just been exposed to soil this week. Anyhow, they are back inside now until this passes.

    I ony feed them chick starter... It is Dumor 24% protein. No treats other than a bug or two they catch in the coop. We have only been raising chickens for a year or so and still have a lot to learn. Should we be feeding them something else? I really didnt want to do medicated feed because I wanted to stay as organic as possible. Should I switch? Is 24% protein way too high?

    How long should I use the sulmet?
     
  7. nuts4chickens

    nuts4chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    oops I meant the disease will delay their development. Will they be poor as adults? Ugghh. I'm bummed.
     
  8. spotsplus

    spotsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Cocci in general takes a toll on the health- particuarly the ones who get the worse symptoms. They do take a bit longer to catch up in development because it takes them a couple weeks to get thier strength back if they have been sick and especially if they have stopped or slowed in eating. Wild birds can bring in Cocci. They can drop poop in the yard so it gets in the soil. You only need to do medicated feed until they are about 4 months old. Babies are very succeptible to Cocci until they are about 6 months old. They can still get it but they can beat it easier. They don't start laying till 5-6 months so if you want as natural an egg as possible, by the time they start laying they will no longer be on medicated feed. Cocci is so common though that I think just about anyone who has had chicks has had it and generally if one chick gets it- they all do (some just show the symptoms more than others).

    T
     
  9. nuts4chickens

    nuts4chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So this is a really stupid question... but does the medicated feed have antibiotics in it, or do they make a medicated feed specifically geared towards cocci? Antibiotics treat bacteria, but cocci is a parasite, right? What feed brands do you recommend?
     
  10. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Usually the medicated chick starter contains Amprolium, which is specifically for the prevention of coccidiosis outbreak.
     

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