Bloody droppings after moving chicks

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by NewORchickmom, Jun 10, 2016.

  1. NewORchickmom

    NewORchickmom New Egg

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    Jun 10, 2016
    Hi, Fisrt time raising chicks. Have 21 from McMurray hatchery that are almost 4 weeks old. Moved them today from the basement to their coop. Put them all in a big pet carrier to move. After I took them all out I saw some leaving bloody-looking droppings. They were all vaccinated for coccidiosis on day 1 & I feed unmedicated feed. None are acting lethargic or off, but I wonder if stress can cause this? Some are exploring the coop more & some hanging out against the edges. When should I be concerned?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sometimes vaccines don't work or chicks get missed when vaccines are supposed to be given. I would take in several fresh droppings to a local vet tomorrow am to get them tested for coccidia. They will also test for worms. Sometimes orangy-red instestinal sheeding can look like blood. Pictures of droppings may help. I would not delay in getting a fecal float test done. Corid or amprollium is the drug to use in treating all strains of coccidiosis, but it will make their vaccines of no use. If they have cocci, though, you can save lives by using it. The cocci vaccines usually work on the worst 4 or 5 strains of coccidia, from what info I have read, but you can also do some research about them online. Any vet that tests dog and cat dropping for worms and cocci can do a fecal float on a chicken, but your regular vet might be more easily convinced even if they don't see chickens. Let us know what happens and if you need Corid dosage.
     
  3. NewORchickmom

    NewORchickmom New Egg

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    Jun 10, 2016
    Thanks! I'll try to get a decent pic tomorrow. It seemed like definite formed droppings (like short fat worm shape) with a cover of reddish-brown stuff.
    The good news is I'm a licensed veterinary technician who can do my own fecal float at work. But I've never worked with chickens. If all seems to be well before Monday I'll just keep an eye on it. But we're not open on weekends so unless one of them goes downhill it will have to wait.
     
  4. NewORchickmom

    NewORchickmom New Egg

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    Jun 10, 2016
    [​IMG]

    Not sure how many of them have droppings like this. I bought some Corid just in case. Should I just go ahead and use it?
     
  5. NewORchickmom

    NewORchickmom New Egg

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    Jun 10, 2016
    Lost one. She was listless today. Decided to do the Corid without confirmation. She didn't want to drink unless I dipped her beak. No interest in eating. Everyone else seems ok. Poor little girl. One of my Americaunas[​IMG]
     
  6. Reamuskitty1

    Reamuskitty1 Out Of The Brooder

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    oh, poor girl I hate to see them dead. I hope the rest survive the rest of the ordeal...
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2016
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Yes, I agree that Corid should be started. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid, or 1 1/2 tsp per gallon of water for 5 days. Vitamins and some plain yogurt for probiotics after finishing treatment will help gut bacteria get back to normal. Make sure they are drinking, or give them concentrated or with a dropper.
     

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