bloody, gaping wound on top of tail from being pecked

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mommajoschickens, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. mommajoschickens

    mommajoschickens New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2009
    I came home tonight and found my little splash cochin ("Chicken Little") in a corner of the coop having been pecked by the other chickens with a bloody, gaping hole on the top of her tail. I read a few posts of similar situations here and have poured a solution of saline with a drop or two of tea tree oil in it over the wound (and was greatly relieved to find that she'll probably make it!). It is a hole, though, and I am afraid to pour too much on it and make it bleed more. She is in a tote with pine shavings and is eating lots and acting very glad to be away from "those mean girls", so, I'm hoping that's a good sign. Any additional advice... or confirmation I'm doing the right thing, would be greatly appreciated!

    Also, she had been separated for a several weeks because she went broody (or was sick for a while) and the other girls started pulling off all her tail feathers. She's the sweetest natured of them all (4 total - hens) and just will not fight back. They were hatched together and they always accepted her before that &, OBVIOUSLY, I didn't reintroduce her to the rest the proper way. I am thinking of waiting 'til spring (my original thought) when they can be out in the yard together again "like olden days" & maybe they won't notice she wasn't there before? I don't have a roosting pole thing and they always wake up & run around when I come out (we brought their coop into the garage for the winter), even at night, so there's no "slipping her in" while they're sleeping. Any suggestions? I won't do anything until she's completely healed, though... I do know that much.
     
  2. Renee

    Renee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2008
    CALIFORNIA
    Hi mommajoe,
    I posted on your other thread.
    You are doing the right thing. It's a good sign that she is eating.

    Others can give you help on how to reintroduce her-- perhaps you could post in "Chicken Behaviors" to see what people have to say about that.
     
  3. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Yes you did the right thing, I had the same thing happen to me just 2 weeks ago, and did the same as you, I put some wound dressing on them and now they are healed.

    The reason for the attack I think was boredom, I cured mine with lots of straw hay that was seeded heavily, and throwing in a lot of extra corn, all the scratching and investigating in the deep hay kept them super busy. when I go out now they are all seperated and busy with their own thing, and no more instances of pecking.

    AL
     
  4. mommajoschickens

    mommajoschickens New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Thanks so much Renee & al6517... that's all VERY helpful. One more question... o.k. TWO more questions...

    1. Do I cover the wound? I have not done that, but, you mentioned "dressing", al6517... does that mean to put gauze on it or just the ointment?

    2. How often should I rinse the wound with the saline solution?

    Thanks, again, for the help! You people are awesome!
     
  5. mommajoschickens

    mommajoschickens New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Um... another question. What do I do about the little feather stubs on her tail? Some look like they have blood in them, although they are not bleeding all over the place, or anything... do I need to/have to pull them out??? How do I know if they are blood feathers? Where ARE blood feathers??
     
  6. chutewoman

    chutewoman Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 28, 2008
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    Do not pull out the bloody starts of the feathers, they are just new feathers (new feather starts are called blood feathers). Once you have cleaned the wound with the solution just keep the ointment on it, add more when it appears dry. There is no need to cover the area. Good luck with your girl!!
     

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