Bloody Poo??

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Bantam90210, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. Bantam90210

    Bantam90210 Out Of The Brooder

    73
    0
    39
    Jun 5, 2011
    Smithsburg/Waynesboro
    What would cause a Chick to have bloody poo? I just got 4 new Silkie chicks, one is about a week old now an I got her on Saturday and the other three I got from the same lady yesterday that range from (now) 2 days old, 1 week old and 1 month old.. Their all in the same tote so I dont know who's the one it belongs to... their all still in quarantine (thank god) but it doesnt change the fact that I just spent over $30 for these chicks and its possible theres something wrong with them.. The larger Blue Silkie chick who is a month old seems to have an upper respitory thing going on because when I picked her up, her left eye was all gooped up and she couldnt open it.. I let it go for the night just so she could settle in an I went to work, when my husband and I came home, it was still gooped shut. I took a warm washcloth that wasnt completely rung out and sat it on her eye for about a minute and when I took it off there was pussy discharge seeping from between her eyelids, when I wiped it off her eye poped open like there was nothing ever wrong with it! [​IMG]
    other then that, besides needing a bit more weight (im use to really fat chickens), they SEEM fine... [​IMG]
    TIA!!
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

    6,771
    130
    281
    Apr 15, 2009
    I would return those birds from wherever they came from. I have a zero tolerance policy for respiratory infections. Most are highly contagious, detrimental to overall flock health, and even if a bird survives the initial infection, they are often rendered a carrier for life. Any birds that come in and go out from an infected flock are usually infected/carrying the illness.

    The bloody poop is probably cocci. Easy to treat if caught in time. A quick round of Sulmet or Corid should do the trick.

    Respiratory illness, though... A much more complicated issue that is hotly debated here.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  3. Bantam90210

    Bantam90210 Out Of The Brooder

    73
    0
    39
    Jun 5, 2011
    Smithsburg/Waynesboro
    Quote:My old boss is a vet and I was suppose to take her down there tomorrow for him to look at her but now that you said thay IDK if its even worth it!
     
  4. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

    6,771
    130
    281
    Apr 15, 2009
    I would definitely take her to see him. Unfortunately, he is likely to tell you the same thing I just did. You can treat respiratory ailments, but they are often not completely curable. If he can run some cultures on the bird, you can find out exactly what she is suffering from. Knowing what you are dealing with is key to making any long-term decisions.

    In the meantime, keep her under strict quarantine. Change your clothing and shoes in between dealing with the sick bird and any healthy birds you may have. Wash your hands and any equipment that may be used on both groups of birds in between caring for each group. If you can keep her in quarantine, maybe she will be lucky enough to be suffering from a fairly simple respiratory illness that is not one that persists forever.
     
  5. Bantam90210

    Bantam90210 Out Of The Brooder

    73
    0
    39
    Jun 5, 2011
    Smithsburg/Waynesboro
    Quote:She hasnt had a fever yet *knocks on wood*, I feel bad cause all of the chicks have to stay in quarantine too since the woman had all of them in the same crate, Normally if I get new chicks around the same time I keep them in quarantine together but seeing that eye made me keep her in with the 2 day old and the 2 one week olds..
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by