Bloody stool

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mamachicky2014, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. Mamachicky2014

    Mamachicky2014 New Egg

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    Oct 7, 2014
    [​IMG]

    One of my 6 Month old laying hens has had bloody stools in nesting box. What should I do?
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  2. hennible

    hennible Overrun With Chickens

    People will need more info to help you. Poops pics would be great. It could be a regular intestinal lining shed or it could be coccidiosis. There are other possibilities too.
     
  3. Mamachicky2014

    Mamachicky2014 New Egg

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    Oct 7, 2014
    There are no other symptoms so far, if it is Coccidiosis, not sure which chicken, so should I get rid of all the eggs till treated?
     
  4. hennible

    hennible Overrun With Chickens

  5. Mamachicky2014

    Mamachicky2014 New Egg

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    Oct 7, 2014
    Thank you and here is a pic.[​IMG]
     
  6. hennible

    hennible Overrun With Chickens

    I don't think it intestinal shed. Not sure at all you need someone with more experience. So any worms in the poop?
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I would treat for coccidiosis with Corid, which you can get at Tractor Supply in the cattle section.

    Corid powder dose is 1.5 teaspoons per gallon for 5-7 days, then 1/3 teaspoon for 7 days.
    Corid liquid dose is 2 teaspoons per gallon for 5-7 days, then 1/2 teaspoon for 7 days.

    Make fresh daily and make sure it's the only source of drinking water. Okay to eat the eggs while being treated and okay to treat all birds.

    -Kathy
     
  8. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    If you've seen this more then once or twice then I really doubt it's shed intestinal lining and I would treat with a round of Corid. Coccidiosis usually does produce lethargy and puffed up birds but in a situation like this you need to start somewhere and it would be very wise to at least be able to rule out coccidiosis. Older birds who've had a chance to develop some resistance can still come down with it and their bodies may fight it off longer then a young chick would. Better to be safe then sorry. I very, very rarely see shed intestinal lining and it's usually not bright red nor a lot of it.

    There is no egg withdrawal period if using Corid (amprolium).
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I would treat with Corid (or amprollium, Ampromed, Amprol) for coccidiosis. Blood in stools can also occur with enteritis and capillaria worm, but I don't think it would be that much. Corid is not an antibiotic, so there is no problem eating the eggs. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid ?Corid, or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon of water for 5-7 days. After treatment (of all birds) give some vitamins and probiotics for several days. If a bird is too sick to drink the medicne, give some with a dropper. Here is some reading: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/12/coccidiosis-what-backyard-chicken.html
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    If you have a small animal vet, call them and see if they look at a poop sample for you. It's also possible that she has worms.

    -Kathy
     

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