Bob Whites

Discussion in 'Quail' started by hillbillybill, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. hillbillybill

    hillbillybill Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2011
    I'm mulling around in my mind about raising quail for fun and profit. I have been doing some research and came across this site, which has already been of some aid. I called up a game resort that is just a few miles up the road from where I live to inquire about whether or not they purchase their quail, and if so what kind of quail, how many, and how much they pay. The owner assured me he does buy the birds from breeders and pays $3.50 per bird. I realize I am new to this, but from my research I've done thus far it appears to me the cost of raising Bob Whites would be considerably more than that. Am I looking in the wrong places for prices or is the guy pulling my chain at what he pays per bird?
    Also, are Bob Whites raised to 20 weeks before they are sold to hunting clubs?
    Perhaps I need to reconsider whether I want to sell to individuals or to hunting resorts. If I sell to individuals would Pharoah quails be a better choice?
     
  2. LivingRootsFarm

    LivingRootsFarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 11, 2011
    Samsula
    Not totally sure what you are exactly asking...but I am new to quail too. As far as pricing when I bought my Coturnix from a farm swap I paid $2 a piece for them. I do not have Bobwhites but did see some for sale for $5. I originally wanted the bobwhites but with further research I found as a first time quailer I should probably start with the Coturnix. I am not that familar with hunting resorts so I can not help you there. Also make sure you check into your rules for your state. I know here in Florida you must obtain a gamefarm license if you want to sell the birds or the eggs. Good Luck!
     
  3. Whitehouse Quail

    Whitehouse Quail Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    Michigan
    If they are flight conditioned, I hear normally about $5-8 a bird. For non flight conditioned, MAYBE Tthat could be a good price. (I almost have sold them for that before, kicked myself, then didn't do it.)

    Bobwhites are about mature at that age, or mature, so yes that would be a good time to sell. However, check to make sure they want flight conditoned or not. You should condition them for about 6 weeks or more, and you can start at 14 weeks so that they are ready to sell at 20.

    And at this moment in time, i would say do both! Bobwhites are more difficult than Coturnix, and Coturnix are a very nice way to ease into shifting from chicken to quail! [​IMG] Individuals buy both, but Coturnix command a lower price. (Normally it is reccomended to start off with Coturnix.)

    If you need any info on Coturnix or to get some eggs/birds, my site is whitehousequail.com . Hope this helps, and have fun with the birds!

    Caution: They are addicting!
     
  4. njduck

    njduck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 15, 2011
    your research is right and he is not pulling your leg. when you you deal in very large bulk it is cheaper. feed is cheaper by the ton then it is by the bag. when buying chicks, it is cheaper per chick when you buy 2,000 then when you buy a 100. my neighbor is 2nd largest mallard duck producer in the country, they hatch out right around 2,000 a week from april till the end of july. their incubators are the size of a large walk in closet. there are 4 running all the time and 1 hatcher. They get their feed via tractor trailer and it is blown in silo's. this whole operation takes up several acres.


    if you want to produce for comercial production you would be way beyond this level. There is alot to consider in an operation like that. It would be better for you to try really small scale like say 100 birds or less and see how things go.
     
  5. hillbillybill

    hillbillybill Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Quote:I think you are right and I am trying to get in way over my head. I was just thinking of a small operation where I can make a reasonable homesteader income. Besides, the operation required for a business is far beyond my ability to financially start up.
    So maybe someone can tell me a more realistic view of starting up this venture. It does sound fun.
     
  6. gamebirdboy

    gamebirdboy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2011
    East Tennessee
    Quote:I think you are right and I am trying to get in way over my head. I was just thinking of a small operation where I can make a reasonable homesteader income. Besides, the operation required for a business is far beyond my ability to financially start up.
    So maybe someone can tell me a more realistic view of starting up this venture. It does sound fun.

    Your best bet would be to start out with a few coturnix and sell at swap meets. After you get the hang of it you can gradually build up to a larger operation.
     
  7. snyd08

    snyd08 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 17, 2011
    IMHO i would keep them as pets LONG before you think about trying to make any money. it;s not easy and not likely some one will just get 100 birds and try and start an operation. EXPERIENCE is what buyers are looking for and that is the one thing you lack. get them as pets then go from there. learn about the birds and the business of it all while keeping them as pets. jeeze make sure you even like them before deciding "it sounds fun! i want to do that" then your not way over you head and your not unhappy as well as the birds. goooood luck with it i hope others will give you better encouragement. [​IMG]
     
  8. snyd08

    snyd08 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 17, 2011
    Quote:I think you are right and I am trying to get in way over my head. I was just thinking of a small operation where I can make a reasonable homesteader income. Besides, the operation required for a business is far beyond my ability to financially start up.
    So maybe someone can tell me a more realistic view of starting up this venture. It does sound fun.

    Your best bet would be to start out with a few coturnix and sell at swap meets. After you get the hang of it you can gradually build up to a larger operation.

    i agree 100 percent with this. dont start with bobs either. they take a long time to grow/reproduce/hatch compared to the ole japanese birds.
     
  9. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I musta done it backwards I started with Bobs then got a few coturnix if you are in a hurry to sell something coturnix is the bird you want around here flight conditioned birds are $8 for bobs $10 for chukars I sell coturnix hens for $6 and roos for $4 if someone wants meat birds they are $4 a bird and I will come down a bit if they are buying more then a few there is a lot of info at different colleges as to how much feed it takes to make a pound of eggs a pound of meat etc bobs are not nearly the little feed pig wasters that coturnix are
     
  10. hillbillybill

    hillbillybill Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Quote:Thanks. I discovered that much. Seems the pharoah (easier to spell this word [​IMG] ) are the easiest to raise, takes the least amount of time and money, and produces quality meat. Not to mention make good pets. I think maybe a dozen birds might be enough to start out with. I guess that would be about three cages.
     

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