Bobcats

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Capvin, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,007
    59
    178
    Apr 13, 2011
    Lake Placid, FL
    Went out this morning to let my six chicks out into their run and noticed several bobcat tracks near the run. Since all the ground is sand it was very easy to recognize the tracks. Our coop and run is very secure and I am fairly certain that a bobcat could not get in. This is our first time raising chicks and what does concern us is that we have also seen bears and feral pigs around in the past. The bears are always very skittish and will run away immediately. However, I am hopeful that the thoughts of fresh chick snack would not cause a bear to just crush our whole setup. As for the pigs, it would be difficult for them to break in but a large enough pig could probably break the wire if it really tried. I have a motion sensor light on the outside and I have ordered some of those red, flashing solar lights. Not sure that any of it does any good, but would like to know what, if anything, could be used to deter something like a bear. Anyone have any experience. Also, have not heard of pigs going after chickens. Anyone have any experience or thoughts on that??



    [[​IMG]]
     
  2. Baymule

    Baymule Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,106
    97
    226
    Jul 1, 2010
    Northeast Texas
    Pigs will eat meat. Feral pigs are destructive and could break in your coop for a chicken snack. I have no exxperience with bears. You might want to put up a hot wire.
     
  3. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,007
    59
    178
    Apr 13, 2011
    Lake Placid, FL
    That's great! If my wife sees your reply she will have me sitting outside with a loaded rifle.
     
  4. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    You married a smart woman. You will get no rest until you have an electric fence up and running. I use barb wire for the bear, for the round wire doesn't work on thier hide. The barbs slip though and does the job. Leave a radio on a talk show in the coop. Music doesn't work for me, but I have watched a bear circle a coop with a talk show on and leave. Just enough human scent and voice noise to keep them away.
     
  5. EMAW

    EMAW Chillin' With My Peeps

    181
    1
    90
    Oct 6, 2010
    SW Michigan
    An electric fence, as the other poster said.

    Never dealt with bears, but if there is something a pig wants inside the coop (grain), they will break through almost any wire fence. Where I hunt the pigs have created a hole in some heavy gauge chain link fencing just because they want to go from the swamp to the forest to forage.
     
  6. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,007
    59
    178
    Apr 13, 2011
    Lake Placid, FL
    Can one of you who suggested an electric fence give me some ideas on how to do that. I am not sure where the electric fence would go other then I assume you would build the fence around the existing run and coop. What height, what materials, etc. Thanks for the help.
     
  7. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Google is your friend, besides searching for the materials to build one you need to know how to install one properly.
     
  8. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,007
    59
    178
    Apr 13, 2011
    Lake Placid, FL
    Yes, I did look but am still confused. If you look at my first post you can see the picture of my exisiting run and coop. It is predator proof except for bears and pigs. Does this mean I will have to put a perimeter electric fence around the entire existing structure??
     
  9. PortageGirl

    PortageGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Others will reply with more and possibly better answers but you could put free standing stakes with the electric on them, but myself, I'd put "stand off" insulators right on the current fence, two levels, one about 12 to 18 inches high, the second up about 30 to 36 inches high. If you have a good feed or farm supply store with knowledgeable people, (some retail establishments aren't careful who they hire, others are) they can help you with what you need and some basic instructions. Fencers aren't crazy expensive and neither is the rest of the supplies you'll need. They aren't very complicated either.

    You can put one of the plastic handles at the gate to the run, so you disable it when you go in, and if you want to leave it off during the daytime, then fasten it at night or if you aren't near. You'll probably get lots of info about heights, it will depend on where you are and what sorts of predators you have etc.

    Bears and hogs are both omnivores so they will be interested in eating both chickens and chicken feed. If you leave any feed outside overnight, start bringing it in, though the scent will always be there, so all that will do is decrease the reward if someone does break into the run at night... hopefully the chickens will be in the coop so they won't get much for their trouble. Either can probably break into the coop too, but would have to be pretty desperate to go there.
     
  10. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    There are several very good page one hits on electric fence in Google in particular the one about the common mistakes made installing them.

    Electric fences are not a cure all (they are but one ring of defense) and don't be so sure that your current enclosure is only subject to bear and pig intrusion.

    For example, I can't tell from the picture you provided if the corrugated roof is properly sealed and if the setup isn't on a concrete pad if there isn't the possibility that tunneling could expose your birds to harm.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by