Bobwhite Quail Housing and Aggression

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Robo, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. Robo

    Robo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 15, 2010
    Knoxville,TN
    There have been a lot of people asking about housing for bobwhites, and how aggressive they are. While some people keep them in colonies there is fighting. Keeping them in pairs and trios is a way to reduce pecking because there is only one rooster so that eleminates fighting for dominance. If kept in a colony pen 1 male to 1-3 females is a pretty good ratio to ensure fertility. If kept on the ground they will need to be wormed regularly. They are best kept on wire, and will sometimes lay year round with artificial lighting but since they are seasonal breeders fertility will suffer. When a bird looks sick or is hurt immediatley remove it and don't be hesitant to cull. These birds are very aggressive and putting them in pairs will not eliminate all problems. Sometimes hens will fight for dominance too, and this can be just as serious as roosters fighting. As chicks if they are too hot they will peck. Some people brood at lower temperatures and use red heat lamps to reduce pecking. Many people beleive that this distorts their vision, but this may not always be the case. If you are planning to release they need to be kept in a large flight pen with little to no human contact. When released most will not survive, but there are exeptions. They need around 2 aquare feet per bird if kept in coveys. I hope this will help a few people who are deciding on what kind of quail to get.[​IMG]
     
  2. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    [​IMG]
     
  3. NeilV

    NeilV Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 15, 2010
    Tulsa, OK
    How do you keep Bobwhites after they are feathered out and while growing them out for meat?

    What sort of cage and how much space per bird?

    I can see keeping 2-3 birds separated as breeders, but that would not work (for me, anyway) if I had a bunch at once.

    Just wondering.

    Thanks,

    Neil
     
  4. Robo

    Robo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 15, 2010
    Knoxville,TN
    Quote:
     
  5. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    BROOKSVILLE FL
    For Colony Breeding You Need Higher Ratio Like 1:3 And More Than 2 Sq Ft Per Bird With Alot Of Hides And/ Or Folliage To Prevent Agression Issues In Most Cases
     
  6. NeilV

    NeilV Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 15, 2010
    Tulsa, OK
    I have read that some of the Jumbo Bobs take a long time to reach full size. Are they grown up enough to eat by the time they are so mature that they need to be separated?

    Also, the reality is that I think I'd prefer to have Bobwhites on the table. Also, Coturnix crowing does not sound too good either. However, Bobwhites sound sound hard to raise, especially for somebody who has never hatched out anything. Since I'm only wanting to raise them for my own use, I don't need to have huge production. I really don't think it would be a problem that they stop laying. What worries me is that I would have a bunch of pit bull birds killing each other before they are big enough for me to eat them.

    Are they really that much harder to raise than Coturnix, or is it just a matter of having enough room?
     
  7. Fat Daddy

    Fat Daddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 11, 2010
    Ks
    Could you describe in detail what your "IDEAL" Bob pen would look like. I plan on building one soon with a 4' x 8' foot print in mind. Maybe stacked with a panel tin roof and wire floors. 2' or so off the ground. Any input would be greatly appreciated...Thanks, Bill
     
  8. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:BOTH
    AS CHICKS IN BROODERS USUALLY YOUR SPACE IS LIMITED AND THEY CAN BE JUNKYARD DOG MEAN LIL BIRDS... SPACE IS KEY ONCE THEY ARE IN GROWOUT PENS... BUT THEN WITH BOBS THERE'S NO TELLING WHEN OR WHERE THAT AGRESSIVE STREAK WILL HIT THROUGHOUT THEIR LIFESPAN. THEY CAN BE CHALLENGING AND IRRITATING AT ANY TIME IN THEIR LIFE. MOST WILL REACH SEXUAL MATURITY AT 24-32 WEEKS (THO MAJORITY WILL NOT SUCESSFULLY REPRODUCE THE YEAR THEY ARE HATCHED)AND ABOUT FULL SIZE OR AT LEAST "MARKET/ SLAUGHTER AGE" AT THAT TIME BUT YES SOME JUMBO STRAINS CONTINUE TO GROW ALBEIT AT A MUCH SLOWER RATE LONG AFTER MARKET AGE.

    KEEP IN MIND THAT MARKET AGE/ SLAUGHTER AGE IS A COMMERCIAL IDEA... THIS IS WHEN YOU GET THE MAXIMUM SIZE FOR MINIMUM INVESTMENT, NOT ACTUAL TOTAL MAXIMUM SIZE THE ANIMAL IS CAPABLE OF. MOST BIRDS RAISED FOR MEAT PRODUCTION ARE KILLED QUITE EARLY IN LIFE... AT THE END OF THE OPTIMUM GROWTH CURVE, NOT THE END OF GROWTH ITSELF BECAUSE AS THE GROWTH CURVE DECREASES YOU END UP FEEDING THEM MORE AND GETTING LESS SIZE IN RETURN FOR THAT EXTRA FEED/ TIME
     
  9. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    THIS WORKS WELL FOR BREEDER PAIRS

    [​IMG]
     
  10. _Randall_

    _Randall_ Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 3, 2009
    Grenada, Ms
    Quote:Don't think for one instance that a 1 male: 2-3 females is ultimate for selective breeding without battering / fatalities. I've witnessed this several times, be it the male as the culprit, or the other female(s). It happens............. I choose 1:3 colony breeding hands down for Bobs. That's just me. [​IMG]
     

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