Boston Terriers - What I Should Know About Ethical Breeding

SpotTheCat

Crowing
Jan 19, 2021
1,535
2,593
375
UK
Yes! I will definitely do more updates! We’ve done so much research and learned a lot more for what it takes. What breed are you interested in breeding?
I don’t know, so many dog breeds! If I do breed it will probably still be in many years, so currently I am just learning at any opportunity I can. I might never actually breed dogs but it does interest me a lot! I haven’t interacted with many dogs thats one thing I really want to do. Breeds high on my I might breed list are
German spitz
Samoyed (I might be getting one in a few years)
Alaskan malamute
Greenland dog
Australian kelpie
Australian shepherd

I am interested in doing dryland mushing, so I might end up breeding dogs for that if I really get in to it. I am also interested in getting a job for breeding guide dogs
 

HorsesRMe123

Songster
Aug 1, 2020
357
494
161
Washington, USA
I don’t know, so many dog breeds! If I do breed it will probably still be in many years, so currently I am just learning at any opportunity I can. I might never actually breed dogs but it does interest me a lot! I haven’t interacted with many dogs thats one thing I really want to do. Breeds high on my I might breed list are
German spitz
Samoyed (I might be getting one in a few years)
Alaskan malamute
Greenland dog
Australian kelpie
Australian shepherd

I am interested in doing dryland mushing, so I might end up breeding dogs for that if I really get in to it. I am also interested in getting a job for breeding guide dogs
Awesome! That sounds like a lot of fun.
 

Geckolady

Counting Chickens B4 They're Hatched
Sep 12, 2020
1,422
6,459
416
east central Arizona
I did the Boston Terrier breeding/showing thing in the 80's. Here are a few things to know:

1. Decent quality Bostons will almost always need a c-section to give birth.
2. The litters are small.
3. Sometimes their milk won't be sufficient, and you will need to purchase artificial milk for them, and feed this to them. It is expensive. Occasionally the female will die under anesthesia or refuse to care for the pups.
4. Eye clearance (CERF testing) and patella checks before breeding are musts.
5. Expect to pay around a grand for a stud fee from a good dog, and you will also need to pay for vet visits.
6. Those pups will cost you more money, and be more work, than if you purchased a puppy from a breeder. No joke. Unless you are actively breeding and showing, and need a dog from a particular bloodline, you would be better off buying a pet from a show breeder who will do all the testing and worrying for you, and sell you a lovely pet.
7. If buying a dog, go to a show breeder, not a backyard breeder. There is a huge difference.

The older dog in your pictures is cute, but it is not what is considered to be show quality. It's probably a wonderful pet. The overwhelming majority of Bostons are not show quality. I can't really get a good look at the pup's conformation.
 
Last edited:

HorsesRMe123

Songster
Aug 1, 2020
357
494
161
Washington, USA
I did the Boston Terrier breeding/showing thing in the 80's. Here are a few things to know:

1. Decent quality Bostons will almost always need a c-section to give birth.
2. The litters are small.
3. Sometimes their milk won't be sufficient, and you will need to purchase artificial milk for them, and feed this to them. It is expensive. Occasionally the female will die under anesthesia or refuse to care for the pups.
4. Eye clearance (CERF testing) and patella checks before breeding are musts.
5. Expect to pay around a grand for a stud fee from a good dog, and you will also need to pay for vet visits.
6. Those pups will cost you more money, and be more work, than if you purchased a puppy from a breeder. No joke. Unless you are actively breeding and showing, and need a dog from a particular bloodline, you would be better off buying a pet from a show breeder who will do all the testing and worrying for you, and sell you a lovely pet.
7. If buying a dog, go to a show breeder, not a backyard breeder. There is a huge difference.

The older dog in your pictures is cute, but it is not what is considered to be show quality. It's probably a wonderful pet. The overwhelming majority of Bostons are not show quality. I can't really get a good look at the pup's conformation.
Thanks for the info! That’s good to know.
 

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