Bra baby? Incubating in your bra?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Magpie-ah, Dec 12, 2014.

  1. Magpie-ah

    Magpie-ah Out Of The Brooder

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    Bra baby?

    I was just wondering what are the main causes eggs don't hatch when incubated in a bra. I know it is a rather odd question, only I have been incubating an egg down there for a four days now. I am really worried that it's not warm enough, and I perfectly understand the fact that we are a lot colder than chickens. Also, will lots of movement prevent the egg from hatching? I am still at school, and so far, it's going fine. The egg is safe and it's not even noticeable. Does boob size matter too? I am only 15 and quite small so will this have an affect on the egg hatching because it won't be warm enough? Also, I am really worried that it will get an infection from me touching it and from body oils. I would love to hatch this egg, and I am already in love with the egg. I know it's unlikely to hatch, but I would still be devastated if it didn't. Any support and advise is very much appreciated. I'll keep you updated on any news. Thank you xxx :)
     
  2. Happy Dad

    Happy Dad Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I would say the main reason eggs incubated in a bra don't hatch well is because they were made to hatch in entirely different conditions than you can provide. They are made to hatch best under a hen who can cover the whole nest with her body, providing the perfect temperature, humidity and other conditions. They can also hatch in an incubator which can provide close to the same conditions as a hen.

    Maybe you could ask for an incubator for Christmas and hatch a few together? Chickens are flock animals and seem most content with other chicken friends.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2014
  4. Skink

    Skink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a novel idea that is sometimes spoken of in old stories from times long since past (I'm talking back when the roman empire was a thing past) but there are a number of reasons that this would be very unlikely to work out, and I really do not recommend you trying it. You'd be better off cobbling together an incubator out of a garbage than getting one to hatch under your breast, especially if your measurement is small enough that you can't tuck something under there and hold it up with it being totally covered even when you're not wearing a bra.

    I'm DD chest size, and I can fit a large chicken egg under either breast, fully covered and no hands to carry w/o a bra. Cleavage isn't really a real thing without the right kind of bra, and those would be incredibly uncomfortable to wear for 21 days straight, so underboob would be the way to do it, not between-boobs... but the egg would either be smothered (yes, eggs "breath," there is oxygen exchange at the shell) or too exposed depending on the set, we have no natural humidity control, and the area is very oily. Underboob might feel warm to your palm, but I checked with my temp gun just now (reads surface temperature of whatever you point it at) and not even my bra free skin to skin restin' boobs get near ideal temperatures under there in a warm room. Not to mention we are not delicate, tender creatures. Breasts gallumph about even in a bra and if the egg doesn't crack in a very bad place to have an egg crack before day 21, it will be contaminated, under heated, choked and otherwise wasted. If you want any shot at hatching, please don't do this! Do not waste a special egg on something doomed to fail. It will only break your heart.

    Your egg can sit by unincubated for awhile, though! Please google "hatching egg storage." If it is fresh laid, that gives you about two weeks to come up with an incubator, as well as some eggs to set with it because chicks do much better with friends - trust me, as someone who has raised lone chicks, you would not be able to manage keeping a lone baby happy and do well in school! ...or even leave the room long enough to do badly in school, haha. They want constant attention and absolutely wail at the top of their lungs from when you leave until when you step back in. I agree with bobbi-j, I would collaborate on your parents to get or build an incubator!

    If you have already started, and you see any development in the egg, then it is already too late to store it. That egg isn't going to hatch without transfer to an incubator. Please don't kick yourself for it! Just research incubation thoroughly, get an incubator, and try again so long as you have a responsible plan for the roosters that will come of it. There is a thread below yours filled with people seemingly hatching bra babies, but if you want a good hatch or are dealing with emotionally or monetarily valuable eggs, don't do it. Artificial incubation in an incubator is tried and true, has mountains of research, and is much less risky. Poor temp hatches raise chances for sicker chicks and deformities.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
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  5. Magpie-ah

    Magpie-ah Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, thanks for all of the great advise, thank you for helping :)
    I have decided to build an incubator, after rummaging through the cupboards I have found everything I need except a styrofoam box. Any ideas on where to get them? Thanks :)
     
  6. Toddrick

    Toddrick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In theory the human body temperature would work, but keeping an egg in contact 24/7 for 21 days is unlikely to succeed without breaking it. The more important concern I have is the quantity of eggs, since a single hatchling would be terribly lonely. Flock animals need a flock, and also consider that the hatch rate might only be around 75%. To hatch six eggs, you will likely need to incubate nine or more. I would say to aim for six minimally, because even if they all live, half will likely be cockerels, which you might need to get rid of [this is really the biggest downer to hatching], leaving you with three pullets.

    As for an incubator, the only critical part you really need, and probably don't have lying around the house, is a thermostat. I used a "water heater thermostat" from the hardware store ($8). There are great YouTube videos on how to wire one up, and it is a fun and easy project. I would also pickup a light bulb fixture ($2) while you're at it so that you don't have to break apart an old lamp or anything. Wire them together using an extension chord (or any type of chord with a plug on one end) and bippidy-boo, you got an incubator. Throw in an old computer fan for better circulation if ya want. I just used a small, clear, plastic, storage tub as the box, and drilled some holes in it for the wiring and ventilation.

    Note: Make sure you test the temperatures at all the various locations eggs will sit around the light, because it could be 104 directly under it, and only 90 a few inches away. This is the hardest part. Hash it all out before putting any eggs in the bator. If you don't already have a good digital thermometer, then you'll definitely need one ($10), and I suggest the kind that record the high/low temps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Styrofoam coolers are quite cheap.
     

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