Brand New Roo!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by LulaGirl6, Jan 15, 2017.

  1. LulaGirl6

    LulaGirl6 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]Hi everyone! Meet Whitey, my brand new 5-month old Mille Fleur D'Uccle bantam Cochin. I adopted him yesterday as his owners were moving and couldn't take him with them. I have a couple questions about him though: he looks and acts totally healthy and normal, how long do I "have" to quarantine him? I wanted to do a month, but we live in a tiny trailer and with a crowing rooster in the house with a toddler trying to take a nap...well, you can guess where I'm going with this. He needs to see the outdoors. Lol. And as far as putting him outdoors goes, will he automatically follow my hens around, or will he do his own thing? (They free-range mostly full time) I don't want to have to search for him when it comes time to lock them up for the night or when I'm have to leave. He's friendly but he's still wary. My plan was, while he was inside for quarantine, to love him up as much as possible so he'd if not come to me at least not run from me. Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2017
  2. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quartine him for about 3 weeks. Teach him your calls, and make him friendly.

    if he is young, he prob will take a lot longer to adjust
     
  3. LulaGirl6

    LulaGirl6 Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, thanks! The hubs is not gonna be happy lol I told him roughly 30 days though so it shouldn't come as a surprise to him. How will the temperature transition bother him? We keep it between 70-72 in the house and outside it averages around 30...plus by the time he goes out it'll be February and even colder...
     
  4. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's the hard part.After quarantine I'd put him in a cage,and every day sit him out there.So he adapts to his area,his hens,and the weather.Raise the time up each day,and do this for about a week,soon the weather shouldn't be a big bother to him after the introducing week is over.

    Start him outside after his quarantine,and every day sit him outside for about 10 minutes,then the next day 20,the next day,30,and add on by ten for the next 4 days,this should work.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2017
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Probably best to 'quarantine' him outside, or at least somewhere not as warm as the house.
    All that going in and out of temp extremes is not going to be great for him.
    Knowing more about your goals, flock, and coop/run might help someone give you some viable suggestions.

    A true biological/medical quarantine is pretty hard to accomplish.
    Handling all birds and not changing clothes and washing between can carry cross contamination.
    Depending on the risk, emotionally/financially, you might just skip it.

    Read up on it :
    BYC Medical Quarantine Article
    BYC 'medical quarantine' search
     
  6. LulaGirl6

    LulaGirl6 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 8, 2014
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    Well at night and during my daughter's nap he's in the basement, which is a lot colder than the rest of the house. I have him upstairs during the day mostly just to get him used to me, the dogs, my daughter (who just LOVES to pet him already), etc. I think what I may do, and don't be afraid to input or tell me it is or isn't a good idea, is keep him inside for a week to get him used to us, and then next week keep him in our cellar way. It's technically indoors but it's not heated, BUT it's a few degrees warmer than being straight outside. Similar to putting him in a garage or barn, or coop. I just don't want the wind to get to him right away. Then after that week I'll turn him out with the girls. I remember about 10 or so years ago when I still lived at home we adopted a chicken and didn't quarantine him and the rest of the flock was just fine. I'm just paranoid I think because my MIL never keeps her chickens separated and in the 4 years she's had hers, she's had probably half a dozen or more die. I've only had one pass and it was due to egg binding. But she also keeps them locked up 24/7/365 and mine are only (maybe) locked up at night. They actually haven't been locked up for about a month lol. Anyway sorry for the long post. Is my plan an ok one or no?
     
  7. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Hi, welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    Well, if he can't see your girls, they might beat him up pretty good if you just toss him out.

    I agree with aart, your quarantine is a good idea but probably not that effective. Mine isn't either. [​IMG]

    I wouldn't get the toddler too used to petting him. Roos and kids often don't mix. Especially once he matures into protecting his girls. How many do you have BTW?

    A good rooster will not be overly friendly with you. He should be OK to hang out. But he should step out of your way as walk past. And basically try to avoid your grasp. You might see it as fear. But in the chicken world it is respect. They are respecting your space.

    If you need a really kid friendly chicken, my daughter loves silkies.

    Best wishes!
     
  8. LulaGirl6

    LulaGirl6 Out Of The Brooder

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    I always hold him when she pets him. She tries to pet the girls outside but they run from her lol so I'm not overly worried. I never thought of it as respect. Not exactly fear either but idk I guess I was just used to the girls squatting down when I approach.

    They can all see each other, it's actually pretty funny because he sits on a shoe organizer in front of the window and whenever one of them walks past or gets up onto the porch he like spazzes out and calls to them lol they just look at him like Why do *you* get to be in the house??

    I have 3 RSL's and 2 EEs. All hens. It cracks me up because my smallest hen is the size of him. (I've never had a bantam or even seen one up close so it amuses me just how tiny he is)

    He doesn't peck me or my daughter though, or show any aggression really (yet), and I don't really let the dogs get close enough - he's in the kitchen and my shepherd/Doberman is about 4 feet away. Each mind in their own business. So I guess I'll just get him used to my voice and calls, and get him used to the cold gradually and hope for the best! Personally I can't wait to get him out because his crow, while tiny, is so loud in a single-wide [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    You really don't want the rooster friendly. They are not like dogs and cats. You want the rooster to respect you and your space, or they will try to dominate you. I know it sounds contrary, but flocks depend on pecking order, and they consider the people that care for them. You want the rooster to move away from you, and to keep about 5 feet away. He should not challenge you, or fluff up. Excessive crowing when you are around is a bad sign.

    If the rooster is friendly, that means he is not afraid of you. Very often, this rooster will think that he needs to control you and keep his hens away from you. You might be able to handle it, but roosters generally attack children first. Roosters have ruined the whole chicken experience for a lot of kids. If I had a toddler, I would not have a rooster. There faces are too close to the size of the roosters attack. A violent rooster can be a violent very quickly, and people not experienced with roosters, may not pick up on the cues that an attack is imminent. This forum is full of posts where the darling became the nightmare in an instant. You don't want that attack on your child.

    Healthy looks healthy. It is not 100%, but I would never live with a rooster in the house. Chickens need to be outside in the light and fresh air. If you have a very valuable flock, or a very large flock where if you lost all the birds, it would be a financial hardship, well, then don't add new birds. If you would go into a mental depression if you lost your flock, well then, don't add new birds. A lot of people pretend to quarantine, but really they don't. If you have a few birds, saw where you got this bird, I would throw him in with the girls and let them work it out.

    I would not add to my flock any bird I felt sorry for. I would never add to my flock any bird that I had gotten at an auction, and exposed to God knows what. But I have often added birds to my flock. Yes I have been lucky. But really, living with a bird is going to create a lot of dust in the house, smell, and cleaning problems. My husband would be constantly mad. Not worth it to me.

    Adding a rooster is one of the easiest single birds to add. Yes the older girls might give him an education, but truthfully that makes for better roosters in my book.

    Mrs K
     
  10. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep friendly roosters and they never attack you.As long as you show respect,and tecah them your boss,you can still keep a sweet rooster.Most people say you cannot but it very well is possible.

    My roosters get close to me,and crow,roosters crow and mate its what they do daily.Never try stopping them.Shoving them off is just like another competing roo,shoving them off a hen,it'll only make him aggressive,or even more aggressive.

    A crow is a symbol of dominance and stating that he owns his territory,so if he does do it as soon as you step foot outside,that could mean he is showing you your dominant,that is a problem,but when you are walking about the yard or doing chores and he is crowing,so what,completely irrelevant to shew at him for no reason,it could just make him aggressive,or if already is aggressive,it will probably just make the situation worse.

    Your choice on what you do.
     

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