Breaking my bank!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jasille2, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. jasille2

    jasille2 New Egg

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    I just dropped my hen off at the vet. She was attacked and her skin was ripped from her neck. She was pecking and scratching as normal (amazing to me!) so I'm guessing its a flesh wound with no organ damage. When I dropped her off the receptionist tells me 100.00 now and the rest when u pick her up....sheesh!… Does anybody have any do it your self suture tips? To my horror there is something called "bumble foot". weak stomach or
    Not I guess I got to get with the "chicken program"!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Most people here do not take their birds to the vet, at least not most of the time. Most everyday vets won't even treat chickens, and avian vets are even more expensive.

    Many wounds on a chicken that you might think should be sutured actually should not be. They need to be allowed to heal from the edges in. If you sew a dirty wound closed, you prevent normal drainage, and interfere with the body's defense system. Obviously, most wounds on a chicken are dirty. You'd be surprised hwo well they will heal with some good "nursing care." They do best indoors where flies can't lay their eggs, leading to maggots in the wound, which is a disaster. You can clean a wound with some homemade saline (Google it) or dilute Betadine or peroxide, or just mild soap and water, and use a human product like Neosporin on the wound, then just leave it open. I would guess that the wound you describe would have healed in a week or two with this method. Ganted, you will probably have a chicken in your bathtub for that period.... For a very minor wound, you can use a little BluKote to mask the red color, and let the chicken heal while in with the flock.

    The only precaution is, chickens are extremely sensitive to any "caine" drugs, sometimes added to wound cleansers, creams and ointments for pain control. Examples are cetacaine, benzocaine, etc. Do not use these on a chicken.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Procaine, too.

    -Kathy
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC!
    When you go get your hen, ask the vet to recommend a de-worming program for you, that should be free of charge.

    -Kathy
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Does anyone have any references to the contraindication of -caine products in chickens? One veterinary student (on BYC) recently stated that they do use those products in her aviary program during surgery, because those products, aside from the numbing properties, also reduce bleeding. That is why, she said, that they are used. Many times here on BYC these rules get repeated over and over, but we never get to see published data or the reasons why.
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook says something about using Penicillin G cautiously in small birds due to the risk of procaine toxicity, but I have not been able to find anything published on any of the other caines. Like you, I would like to see something that's been published. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    -Kathy


     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013
  8. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, chicken heath care is a little tricky. There are some owners who do seek vet care, some that never do, and people in the middle. Chickens treated purely as pets are very expensive. Chickens treated purely as livestock can be cheap/profitable, again with lots of space between. You just have to decide where on the spectrum you want to fall and how you are going to deal with medical situations is one of the those choices.

    There is a lot of good information on the internet (there is bad info too so be sure to do lots of research and check sources) and on this site and people are very generous with their info and experience. You can find step by step videos or pictures for most common chicken health problems. Bumble foot sounds scary but is actually an easy-ish home surgery and I have seen a number of good how tos -- but it's all about your personal comfort level. There is no right choice here, just what is right to you.

    I personally have done a home crop surgery and have nursed a chicken have to health after an attack. I have also euthanized birds that were beyond help. But, I fall in the middle of the spectrum and while I name by birds and take the time to tame them and like to hang out with them, I also eat some of them when they stop laying and am not interested in a $500 + meal. I also do understand why people decide to go the other way -- I have spent way too much money on my dogs.

    Having a "chicken hospital" on hand is a good idea. A large dog crate works great and is easy and you can often find them used for not too much. But, you can also make your own box if you rather. Chickens heal surprising well on their own if kept isolated and very clean with healthy food and a warm safe space. They are tough.

    Good luck. I hope your bird heals well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013
  9. jasille2

    jasille2 New Egg

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    I thank you for the input. I guess being new has its drawbacks!! My heart just felt a torn as her little neck. When I picked her up from the vet told me she did not need stitches and would heal very well on her own. She prescribed an oral antibiotic and told me to clean her wound twice a day with betadine (witch I was already doing) she also prescribed an ointment that when applied the hen has to be separated from the others for an hour. I paid 100.00 when I dropped her off and when I picked her up I thought for sure that was it because she did not see her neck!! Lo and behold.... The cute girl with the sweet smile said "the remainder of your balance is 40.00!!! Hmm. I think I better learn quick!
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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