Breed and Gender please!

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by mollychick2013, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. mollychick2013

    mollychick2013 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Numbered the pictures to make it easier. 6 & 7 I am fairly certain are female black sex links (as the person we got the eggs from had black sex links) but would like confirmation on that... 1-4 look like chipmunks [​IMG] and 5 although similar doesnt have the striping that they have and even has some metallicy silver looking fur in places.


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  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Way too young for gender guesses. Probably half a dozen breeds have chipmunk looking chicks, so breed is hard unless you can give us some parent breeds to work with. Also, would they be mixed breeds? The two black chicks could have a black sex link momma, but sex linkage is a one time deal--the offspring of a sex link isn't a sex link, it's just a generic mutt layer.
     
  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Cute little batch of chicks!

    I agree that unless you've got first generation black sex links, having sex linked blood simply means they are mixed breed "mutts." Sex links are not a breed but a hybrid mix. The next generation does not carry on the characteristics of the color coding of the first. And, unless this person kept strict pens separating the roos and chickens according to breeds, you likely have mutts with the chipmunks too.

    Having said that, I like mutts as mine have typically matured early and been healthy and hardy..."mutts" were the backbone of the small farmer for years.

    Now if you know the breeds on the farm, and know they were kept separate we can give some ideas of the chipmunks as you could have anything from a Welsummer to a Patridge Rock to a Barnvelder to a Speckled Sussex to a Brown Leghorn to an Easter Egger to...you get the idea. Comb pattern, leg color and chipmunking can help identify them but without knowing the parents there are a lot of breeds that produce chipmunk chicks that are very hard to tell apart.

    Good luck with your little brood. [​IMG]

    Lady of McCamley
     
  4. mollychick2013

    mollychick2013 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, I was told by the person we got the eggs from that the eggs came from black sex link hybrids and brown leghorn rooster
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2013
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    If that is the hens and roo you've got for all the chicks...the chipmunking will be from the leghorn side of things and the black chicks from the black sexlink side of things keeping in mind the hens carried genes from a barred and non-barred types (usually a red type roo like a RIR over a barred rock hen)...which breeds made that varies with the hatcheries...how it divided out is according to the genetic percentages which I can't quote you but many on this site can (ie of that mix 25% will be xxxxx 50% might be xxxxx, etc.)

    So they are all hybrid mixes (mutts) but you should have some really awesome layers from this (color of eggs will vary...tending to be mostly brown I should think...someone with better egg shell genetics will step in here).

    I really enjoy my Black Sexlinks. They are friendly, curious, smart (almost too much so for their own good as chickens go), and good layers. I've not cared for Leghorns so much as they tend to be noisier and more flighty, but they are excellent layers. Mutts from these two breeds tend to exhibit the best of the sides in my experience. You probably won't get good meat birds as neither one is particularly a heavy carcass...but you may not care about "freezer camp" for the unneeded roos.

    Your roos will get large redder combs, much more noticeable than the pullets, but the pullets will likely get larger combs as females go due to the Leghorn. You will probably have indications of the sexes by 6 weeks, but don't make final proclamations until they are fully exhibiting clear characteristics...ie you are certain by crowing and/or male feathers. So don't be alarmed if your mutts mature a bit faster than the normal especially with Leghorn in the mixture. I had a mutt Leghorn pullet lay at 13 weeks...I was convinced she was going to be a he until she laid eggs as she matured so quickly.

    Have fun with your new flock.
    Lady of McCamley
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2013
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  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    With that mix you'll have some black birds--you can tell those--and some partridge-ish looking birds. The hens should be wonderful layers! The roosters a little on the small side for good table birds, but at least they won't eat much if you intend to keep them.
     

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