Breed question from a newb

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Scoots, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. Scoots

    Scoots New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Aug 21, 2010
    Brownsville, OR
    Can someone please highlight the differences between Buff Orpingtons and Buff Plymouth Rocks?
    To me there's very little difference, except the Orps have white legs and the Rocks have yellow legs, but I'm a newb, so what do I know.

    I'm going to my first poultry show in Oct. in Stevens, Wa. I'd like to be a little better informed than I am now. I'll be spending the winter building a hen house and enclosed run (lots of raccoons in my area), and getting chicks in the spring.

    For those that have had both Buff Orps and Buff Rocks - which did you prefer?
     
  2. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    [​IMG]

    Buff Rocks
    Comb, Face, Waddles, and Ear-Lobes: Bright Red
    Beak: Yellow
    Eyes: Reddish Bay
    Shanks and Toes: Rich Yellow

    Buff Orps
    Comb, Face, Waddles, and Ear-Lobes: Bright Red
    Beak: Pinkish white
    Eyes: Reddish Bay
    Shanks and Toes: Pinkish White
     
  3. Yellow House Farm

    Yellow House Farm Overrun With Chickens

    2,050
    858
    268
    Jun 22, 2009
    Barrington, NH
    Quote:,

    Well, Plymouth Rocks and Orpingtons spring more or less for the same time period in the 1800's during which it was all the rage to develop new breeds (Rocks, Orpingtons, Wyandottes, etc...) and new varieties (barred, white, buff, partridge, etc....) They are, however, different. The former are distinctly American, while the latter are certainly English. Both show the general trends of their homelands during that time period. Both, being Buff, betray a trend during that time period to be enamored with Asiatics, which had been newly imported to the Western world. Indeed, they were such a surprise at the time that it began what is called the "Cochin Craze". Prior to their importation, there were no buff birds in the West. This sort of information is generally absent from modern poultry books. To learn more, go to "Google Books" which is an on-line compendium of books that are out of print. Search for poultry and the breeds that interest you, and various titles will pop up. They are readable on line for free. Click on one and begin the rather cool discovery of how the various breeds were developed. It's rather interesting.

    For production qualities, Plymouth Rocks tend to be better layers. However, I am of the opinion that an Orpington is a better eating bird. Both lay brown eggs (another effect of Asiatic importation, for all traditional breeds of European poultry lay white eggs, and brown eggs were developed via outcrossing to new Asiatic imports which all lay brown eggs.) Both are good broodies and attentive mothers.

    However, as one begins to get to know chickens more deeply, one realizes all of the different subtleties. Plymouth Rocks and Orpingtons are very different in shape, often referred to as type or conformation. They have a different feather quailty. Plymouth Rocks, though not very tightly feathered are much more so that Orpingtons which are quite loose feathersed, which gives them a more massive appearence.

    Do some homework and then choose one of them. Both breeds have breed clubs, which are networks that unite breeders of the one breed and help them maintain communication. Both can be visited on-line.

    I hope this tempts you to adopt on of these lovelies. When well bred, they are amazing both. As a child my father maintained Buff Rocks, and they were outstanding.

    Best to you!
     
  4. Scoots

    Scoots New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Aug 21, 2010
    Brownsville, OR
    Thanks for the replies.

    We have significant rainfall in western Oregon, last winter we had about 72".
    Is there one of the breeds (Orps or Rocks) that does better in a wet climate over the other?
    Thought I'd better ask.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by