Breeding & Bachelor Pad Questions

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MeghanFaith, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. MeghanFaith

    MeghanFaith Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2013
    Okay here it goes.....

    I currently have a EE Roo with 1 EE hen, 2 speckled sussex, 3 barred rock and 3 mixes.

    I would like to start selling pure breed hatching eggs of the EE, Speckled Sussex and Barred Rock. Maybe even hatch them out and sell my chicks locally.

    I plan on getting a barred rock roo and speckled sussex roo also. I like the bachelor pad idea to keep my hens and roos separated. That way I can let them free range every other day, boys one day and girls the next.
    Here is my plan: When I need hatching eggs put the chosen hens & roo together in a pen and make sure they do the deed, then put the roo back with the other boys once he finishes his job. Sorta like you do with you breed rabbits. Will this work?

    How long once I separate my hens from my EE roo for the eggs to no longer be fertile and allow me to breed them to a new roo?

    How long should I wait for the new eggs to be fertile?

    How long does a roos sperm last? How often should I breed them?

    SO many questions

    I would love any and all advice!
     
  2. rainbowrooster

    rainbowrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 26, 2011
    First off, EE are not pure bred birds. The are a blue egg laying mutt. Nothing wrong with that but they are no more pure bred than feral cats.

    I would give separation a couple of weeks just to avoid most surprises.

    Yes, you can rotate the roosters like rabbits. Introducing new roosters to you current males will be your problem.

    You can have fertile eggs the day after mating.

    The sperm will stay viable for many days so you don't have to breed everyday.
     
  3. alldembirds

    alldembirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 19, 2013
    I think the poster is aware of that thats why he clearly states he wants to start breeding pure bred and plans on getting pure bred roosters
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  4. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Serenity Valley
    In theory. But it doesn't always work for me. I get some hens who just plain don't like the rooster they are with and get uppity and don't let breeding happen. OR ... get this ... they are so upset by the whole thing that they quit laying eggs. I had a hen last summer stop laying eggs the whole time she was in the pen with the rooster I wanted her to breed with. I know she was laying before I moved her to that breeding pen. She was laying. Then she quit. Sure being moved had something to do with it, but after two months in the breeding pen, she should have started laying again. I love her to death, but that was bothersome. So just a heads up ... a few hens that can't remain calm enough to be moved and put with a new rooster and still lay eggs and some won't like their new boyfriend.

    They say it's 3 weeks. I will go 4 weeks just to be sure if it's important ... as in, I won't be able to hatch more till next spring.

    You most likely won't be able to tell parentage of your chicks if there's a chance the EE was the father. If the father is EE, the chicks could be black from BR mother or chipmunk with the SS mother, which is the same as if the correct father was used. If the father is SS with a SS mother, chicks should usually be chipmunk. If the SS dad is with a BR mother, the chicks will be black or barred. If the BR dad is with SS mother the chicks will be barred. That would make guessing the parentage of the chicks in case of breeding errors pretty messy.

    There's no real way to know. The hen takes in the semen and stores it inside her and fertilizes each egg that comes down the pike (obviously I'm talented with technical terminology - ha!). It can last 3 weeks, but that's not a given by any means. I personally would hope for a week.

    Some folks say that after a week, that the new rooster's semen will more likely be the one taking over the fertilization process because there's so much more of it in the storage compartment (I've forgotten the name of the reservoir inside the hen). But I haven't done any testing of that.

    I just keep the hens and rooster in the same pen or coop and let them out to forage together. That way, I know he's mating with her often enough that all the eggs she lays are going to be fertilized (if they are getting along).

    Can you do that instead? Can you keep two coops and just keep the barred rocks in one coop and the speckled Sussex in another coop and let them out to forage on alternative days? At least that way, the hens and rooster will have a chance to form a bit of a normal relationship?? Plus, believe it or not, I get tired of going out after dark and moving chickens around in the dark. Plus, I always take a shower afterward and wash all my clothes because I often have to get on the ground or crawl through some muck at some point. Invariably one with start flapping and that will be the one that just finished her dustbath 5 mins before she went up on the roost. I kinda think they don't really like to be moved around all the time either.

    There are so many choices and set ups that can work. Your idea is perfectly doable and worth a try. With chickens, you just never know. They have minds of their own and are continually surprising me with their range of abilities and features and knowledge. Give it a go. With the way your coops are set up, your system is probably the best arrangement for you. The main thing is have fun with it. I know I do. [​IMG]

    I'm interested in hearing what others have to say!
     
    2 people like this.
  5. MeghanFaith

    MeghanFaith Out Of The Brooder

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    I guess it will all fall into place for better or worse! My biggest reason for wanting to try this, is because people like to know what they're getting aka pure bred chicks. I don't plan on starting a business by any means, just enough for people nearby. Also with my group of chickens I can leave all my hens together and still know who laid what by the way their eggs look.

    My biggest issue here in WV is flat land, we have close to 20 acres but only maybe 1 or 2 that's actually flat. No, I don't mean rolling hills either I mean you look out my window and see nothing but 45degree mountainside [​IMG]. I'm not lazy by any means but having to hike up my backyard with feed or water can get tiresome.

    As soon as I get my hands on a Barred Rock Roo and Speckled Sussex Roo I will separate my EE roo from the flock and begin operation "bromance". If they won't play "nice" in a bachelor pad together then I will try individual pens.
     
  6. rainbowrooster

    rainbowrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 26, 2011
    Well, alldembirds. I underlined the posters statement that they would like to start selling pure breed hatching eggs from EEs. Maybe you did not clearly read that part. If you read my whole short post you will notice that I clearly made no mention of the Rocks or Sussex since they would be pure bred. I wanted the poster to be aware of the fact that EEs are not pure bred birds so that hopefully they will not be labeled as such when they are sold
     
  7. MeghanFaith

    MeghanFaith Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2013
    Okay really there isn't any need to nit pick. We all know what EE's are right? Easter Eggers. I'm sure we all know some of the qualities these chickens have and MANY companies sell these birds. While the integrity, purity, and mysterious nature of the species may be in question to some, most people know what I mean when I say EE. Of course none of my chickens have paperwork to show their lineage so technically they are all mutts of a different color but with certain expected attributes. EVERY chicken is technically a mutt until someone starts to breed for certain qualities like feathering, color, or eggs. The qualities of the EE's I have are blue or greenish eggs and puffy cheeks, while I realize I cannot guarantee these traits. I am breeding birds that all have these qualities for the high probability for their off spring to carry on such traits. While I am no scientist or poultry expert & I don't claim to be :) I'm just a silly WV hick with some common sense, well I least I hope! :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2015
    1 person likes this.

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