breeding bettas what do I do

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by goofy98, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. goofy98

    goofy98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 25, 2011
    Prineville
    I had a male and a female together and he made a bubel nest and they had a cuppel of eggs but I cant see them anymore but I dont know what to feed them ether so HELP!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  2. Moxiechick

    Moxiechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 15, 2010
    Maine
    Breeding bettas can be complicated sometimes.
    Even though bettas can be kept in small tanks, they should be given a fairly large tank to breed in. This is to benefit the female, because the males can get quite amorous to the point of chasing the female to death. A female in breeding condition will show a couple of vertical bars on her sides and be quite plump. However, the males will continue to hound the female even when she has laid all her eggs, at which time she should be removed to her own tank to rest up and recondition. The male will guard the eggs and nest. The water should be fairly shallow, only about 6-7 inches deep, as this will enable the male to catch any eggs that fall out of the nest before they get lost from sight .

    Her is a link with more info. [​IMG] http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/bettafish/breeding.php
     
  3. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Escanaba, MI
    If you don't know what to feed them then you should definitely put off breeding until a later time. Betta fry need tiny, LIVE food. Freshly hatched brine shrimp, microworms, and vinegar eels are the betta breeder's staple. They will NOT each pellets, even crushed, and will starve without small enough live food. Microworms and vinegar eels need to be bought as starter cultures from other breeders. To hatch brine shrimp, you need the right setup and fresh brine shrimp eggs.
     
  4. goofy98

    goofy98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 25, 2011
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    ok well my fish tank is a 25 to35 gallon and I think the male ate the babies I took the female out but she only had 7 eggs and my fish tank is rilly deep so should I take the roks out and take some of the woter out?
     
  5. tweetyflights

    tweetyflights Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 16, 2010
    It's unlikely that the male ate the babies, probably the female if anything. Sad to say, but i doubt the babies are still alive, and is they are, they won't be able to survive any longer without food (TINY,live food as others said). Not trying to sound rude, but you really should RESEARCH,RESEARCH, RESEARCH before breeding anything. Betta's take up a lot of room when you breed them, as the males have to all go in separate tanks but the females can go together in a very Large tank (depending on clutch size). With 100-300 babies, it's a lot. The website Moxiechick gave you is a good one, but also Google and look at MANY different sites.
     
  6. Squishy

    Squishy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2011
    Florida
    The eggs were likely eaten.

    Males will eat eggs too, especially if they weren't fertilised.

    If there were only 7 eggs or so that you saw released, and you were watching for a while, sounds like they only wrapped the one time. A normal spawning session will involve wrapping many times.

    Recommended for breeding Bettas is a 10 or so gallon tank, bare of gravel, with only a sponge filter. If you have a power filter or similar, it would have already sucked up any eggs or fry most likely.

    If the temperature was heated less than 80 or so, the eggs may never have hatched. At 82 degrees, it takes about 48 hours for eggs to hatch.


    If you want to breed, you will need to research the right set-up for it, and have fry foods in advance. You can't find the right fry foods at a pet store usually, except for BBS... but other foods you can find online.


    So I'd say, don't worry... your adult fishes just got a little snack. Sometimes my females in all by themselves will release clusters of eggs and go about eating them. Seems to make them happy [​IMG]
     
  7. goofy98

    goofy98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 25, 2011
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    Ok well I did research and I thought I could feed them hay well not hay lol but the stuff that comes out of it thats what one of the websites said and I dont think she was pregnet enuf to have a bunch of eggs and they wrapped like a bunch but she didint released any eggs most the time but when she did it was like only 3 eggs at a time and I was waching them the whole time.
     
  8. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Fish don't get pregnant. The term is 'gravid' for when they are carrying eggs.
     
  9. Squishy

    Squishy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2011
    Florida
    Yeah... They don't get pregnat X2.
    The female will always have eggs.. lots of eggs. Those eggs need to be released, fertilised, and they need to hatch before there are any babies.

    Hatching takes a certain temperature, it takes a daddy tending the eggs to keep them free of fungus, it takes still water so the eggs don't get sucked into a filter, it usually takes quite a number of eggs to produce half as many viable fry, and still many fry die of varous causes in the first few days of life.. including their bigger siblings eating them too.

    Bettas are strictly carnivores... meaning meat. They eat creatures they would find in the water in the wild... mosquito larvae, freshwater shrimps, other kinds of fish fry (babies), other small freshwater organisms.

    Just close your eyes and imagine a rice paddy or canal or river in Thailand... You're under the water, ok... Where would the fish find hay (aka dried grass) to eat?

    Anyway... they weren't meant to eat vegetation... they were meant to eat other creatures, period. The fry (babies) especially need their diet to include creatures that are living.

    Thus, neither of your fish would have much trouble gobbling up their own young. The daddies protective instinct sometimes doesen't kick in until they have a large group of eggs going, sometimes until their second or third spawn attempt. And if all the eggs got lost in the gravel, as they can and will do, he wouldn't be able to find them to protect them at all.

    Sorry if that's not what you wanted to hear [​IMG]
     
  10. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Wait, were you thinking of feeding them infusoria and using the hay as the medium for it? Hate to say it, infusoria are not a very reliable food source at all, because the chances of making a foul, bacteria sludge as opposed to getting infusoria for the fry to eat is very high.
     

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